Tag Archives: Women In Technical Careers

Minnesota Multi Housing Association awards Construction Project Management student with MADACS Award

Construction Project Management student and WITC Scholarship recipient Marydithe Edgerton holding MADACS awardCongratulations to Construction Project Management student and WITC Scholarship recipient Marydithe Edgerton, who was recently awarded with a Multi housing Achievement in Design, Advertising and Community Support (MADACS) Award in Individual Maintenance.

The Award—given annually by the Minnesota Multi Housing Association (MHA)—recognizes an individual who independently manages the maintenance of an apartment building while also making significant contributions to the progression of the multi housing industry.

The MHA is a state-wide, non profit organization with over 2,000 members representing more than 250,000 housing units.

A better life

Earlier this year, Edgerton applied for Dunwoody’s Women in Technical Careers Scholarship, which provides financial, academic and personal support to women pursuing a non-traditional career.

Edgerton, who graduated high school in 2010, said it was a “no-brainer” to go back to school—the difficult part was figuring out how to balance five days of work and four nights of class each week.

But, “I knew I had to go to college to make a living,” she said.

So, a few months later, when Edgeton learned she was not only accepted into Dunwoody but had also received the scholarship, she knew it was time to go back.

Edgerton is now halfway through her first semester in the Construction Project Management program.

Despite now being a full-time student, Edgerton still helps manage The Lamoreaux apartment complex, an affordable housing building in Minneapolis. Her responsibilities range from replacing drywall, to fixing a leaky faucet, to helping set up cable TV. Edgerton also confirms that the apartment’s lights work, doors lock, and the carbon monoxide and smoke detectors are on—ensuring the building is a clean and safe place to live. 

The nomination process
The Lamoreaux Apartments. Photo credit to www.aeonmn.org/properites/lamoreaux

The Lamoreaux Apartments. Photo credit to www.aeonmn.org/properites/lamoreaux

Edgerton’s supervisors nominated her for the award this past spring, impressed by her consistent dedication to the building. Over the summer, MHA Judges visited the apartment complex where Edgerton showed them the building, explained her responsibilities, and participated in a formal Q&A. Edgerton discovered she won the award in late September.

“Winning this award means a lot to me,” Edgerton said. “Especially because I have only been in maintenance for about a year and a half.”

“Since then, I have put so much of myself into this building. Not only in the pride I take in it, but also on behalf of all the residents that live here. They know that I am here to help them. I don’t ignore them or discount their opinions. I work with them as much as I can because, after all, this is their home.”

Edgerton will graduate with an associate’s degree in Construction Project Management in Spring of 2017. She hopes to continue her career in affordable housing as a Project Manager—preferably at Aeon, the company she currently works for.

Learn more about Construction Project Management or Women in Technical Careers.

Women in Technical Careers Scholarship Provides More Than Financial Support

Women in Technical Careers (WITC) is Dunwoody’s new scholarship program designed to help women students succeed in technical degree programs at Dunwoody. Recipients of the scholarship receive $20,000 in scholarship funding and childcare assistance if needed.

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However, WITC is much more than just financial assistance. It also serves as a series of support services and networks–all designed to remove barriers that often prevent women from seeking non-traditional professions.

“Throughout their time at Dunwoody, WITC students participate in a cohort program, a mentorship program and monthly professional development workshops. They also have direct, one-on-one support from an advisor,” said Women’s Enrollment Coordinator Maggie Whitman. “While the scholarship funding helps, it’s these support services that really make a difference.”

IMG_1692Perhaps one of the most successful support services offered is the mentorship program. Modeled after research findings on the best way to support women students in a technical career, the program pairs each student with a local, successful woman in the same profession.

Mentors include women such as Claire Ferrara, Interim Executive Director of MEDICO; Cathy Heying, Founder of The Lift Garage; Karin McCabe, Workforce and Vendor Outreach Coordinator from McGough Construction; and many more.

“The mentorship program is important because it connects our students with women who are experienced at navigating workplacesIMG_1747 where few women work,” Whitman said. “Mentors can share job searching advice, industry information, and personal experiences that will prepare our students for their lives after graduation. It’s important for our students to hear this type of feedback and advice from women who have had similar life experiences. A simple, ‘I’ve been there, and I made it through…’ can go a long way.”

The mentorship program officially kicked off last month at a social event on campus. Students and their mentors were able to meet in person for the first time and get to know one another over appetizers and beverages.

“The students were very excited to meet so many professional women in their chosen careers,” Whitman said. “I also heard from the mentors that they appreciated the opportunity to network with other professional women. I think this program will be beneficial for everyone involved.”

IMG_1750Mentors and students will meet in person several more times throughout the next two years. They will also communicate regularly online.

The WITC scholarship was awarded to 22 women in 2015. The students are currently enrolled in programs like Automotive, Computer Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing and Construction Sciences & Building Technology.

The WITC students are expected to graduate in Spring of 2017.

Learn more about Women in Technical Careers.

Kate’s Club members visit woman-owned Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating

Nine Dunwoody women visited the woman-owned blacksmithing and metalwork shop Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating located in Minneapolis.

Nine Dunwoody women visited the woman-owned blacksmithing and metalwork shop Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating located in Minneapolis.

Earlier this month, nine Dunwoody women visited the woman-owned blacksmithing and metalwork shop Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating located in Minneapolis.

According to ironmaideniron.com: “Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating is a one-woman custom metal fabricating company run by Heather Young. She’s worked in the metalwork business since 1995, first as an office assistant and then in the shop. Formally educated in Minneapolis and trained through the Guild of Metalsmiths in St. Paul, she takes on industrial, commercial, and residential fabrication.”

Young honed her welding skills through a Workforce Training & Continuing Education course at Dunwoody.

Young honed her welding skills through a Workforce Training & Continuing Education course at Dunwoody.

Young honed her welding skills through a Workforce Training & Continuing Education course at Dunwoody.

She talked about her welding career and experience as a mother and small business owner. She also demonstrated blacksmithing processes by creating a decorative hook.

Young demonstrated blacksmithing processes by creating a decorative hook.

Young demonstrated blacksmithing processes by creating a decorative hook.

The group of Dunwoody women left inspired by Young’s story of setting up a blacksmithing shop at an orphanage in South East Africa before starting a metal fabrication business out of her garage in Minnesota—in 2009 she moved the business into a rented warehouse space.

Current students from the College’s Welding Technology department who attended the field trip were offered occasional work at the Iron Maiden shop.

The group of Dunwoody women left inspired by Young’s story of setting up a blacksmithing shop at an orphanage in South East Africa before starting a metal fabrication business out of her garage in Minnesota—in 2009 she moved the business into a rented warehouse space.

The group of Dunwoody women left inspired by Young’s story of setting up a blacksmithing shop at an orphanage in South East Africa before starting a metal fabrication business out of her garage in Minnesota—in 2009 she moved the business into a rented warehouse space.

Young’s business plan: to not have a plan and adapt to the industry’s needs. So far, her plan has been as strong as iron.

For more information about Iron Maiden Metal Fabricating, visit www.ironmaideniron.com.

For information about upcoming Kate’s Club events, email katesclub@dunwoody.edu.