Tag Archives: School of Engineering

Dunwoody College of Technology’s School of Engineering Adds Electrical Engineering

AUGUST 16, MINNEAPOLIS, MN – Dunwoody College of Technology is expanding its School of Engineering by adding a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. The new degree offering adds to the pipeline of graduates Dunwoody looks to provide the state of Minnesota to help address the skills gap. The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) predicts nearly 5,000 new mechanical, software, electrical, and civil engineering jobs will be available in the state by 2024.

“We decided to add Electrical Engineering to our School of Engineering because there is an industry need for them, and it’s a great fit with our other two engineering majors—Mechanical and Software,” President Rich Wagner said. “So many engineering projects require the expertise of an electrical engineer. We’re confident that our hands-on, real world approach to engineering education will produce electrical engineers who will provide immediate value to the companies they join and go on to help solve many of the issues facing the modern world.”

Dunwoody’s degree will incorporate the College’s life-long values of hands-on learning, problem-solving, teamwork and professionalism. In particular, Electrical Engineering will stress systems engineering so that graduates are adept at interacting with those from different disciplines. This experience is important as sensors, controls, and power are integrated into nearly every technology currently in use.

From wireless communication to electrical power, electrical engineers play an integral role in a variety of industries, including energy, construction, medical, telecommunications, transportation, and computing.

Dunwoody is now accepting applications for the new degree program, which will start its first class in August 2018.

Other points of note: 
  • Electrical Engineering students will benefit from the lab spaces and equipment already present on campus, including electrical labs used by electrical construction students and electronics, controls, and robotics labs used by manufacturing and mechanical engineering students.
  • The decision to launch a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering was made in consultation with numerous industry leaders and professionals who underlined the need for electrical engineers who can not only design but also implement engineering projects.
  • Dunwoody has been approved to offer the degree by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education as well as the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. The Commission’s web address and phone number are: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org and 312-263-0456.

For more on Electrical Engineering and the School of Engineering see: http://www.dunwoody.edu/engineering/

Media contact:

William Morris, Director of Marketing & College Relations
wmorris@dunwoody.edu; 612-381-3367

For Admissions information:

dunwoody.edu/admissionsinfo@dunwoody.edu; 612-374-5800

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied education to more than 200,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers and become outstanding technicians, successful entrepreneurs, and industry leaders. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, Dunwoody offers more than 30 certificate, associate’s degree and bachelor’s degree programs in the areas of Applied Management, Automotive, Computer Technology, Construction Sciences & Building Technology, Design & Graphics Technology, Engineering, Radiologic Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing, and Workforce Training & Continuing Education.

Dunwoody teams win Third and Fifth at 7th Annual Autonomous Snowplow Competition

Dunwoody teams also received the Dr. Nattu Natarajan Best Sportsmanship Award

Autonomous_Snowplow_Competition_2017

Dunwoody College of Technology recently competed in the Institute of Navigation (ION)’s Autonomous Snowplow Competition held during the St. Paul Winter Carnival in Rice Park January 26-29. The College entered two robotic snowplows–the Snow Devil and the Wendigo.

The Snow Devils earned fifth place and a $700 prize, while Team Wendigo placed third, earning a $2000 prize and the Bronze Snow Globe Award.

The College, as a whole, also brought home a $500 prize for the Dr. Nattu Natarajan Golden Smile Award for best sportsmanship. The Award is named after University of Michigan-Dearborn professor Dr. Narasimhamurthi Natarajan (often called “Nattu”) who was known for his quick, insightful analysis followed by a joke and a smile.

Nattu passed away from a lung illness on the Saturday morning of the 2016 competition while his two teams were competing. ION renamed its team sportsmanship award in honor of his leadership.

This year, thirteen teams from the top engineering universities in the Upper Midwest participated. Dunwoody is one of just two schools that have been competing in the annual event since it first began in 2011. The College has since taken home several awards, including a third place prize in 2016.

Dunwoody adds new robot to roster

This year, Dunwoody decided to try something new by adding a second robot to its snowplow roster.

“With the new engineering programs coming online, we had a lot of interest from our Mechanical Engineering students,” Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle said. “We always have interest from our Automated Systems & Robotics students. We even had a welder interested in it this year. So we had a lot more interest up front.”

From To to Bottom: Team Wendigo, Snow Devils

From To to Bottom: Team Wendigo, Snow Devils

 The Snow Devil was built to compete in the first year of the competition. Since then, students have refined and added to this original design. The robot functions by following magnetic strips that can be installed on any sidewalk or driveway.

The new Wendigo machine was created to complement the Snow Devil.

“When I found out they were letting us build a whole new robot, I thought, okay, we need to make this separate from the Snow Devil,” Automated Systems & Robotics student William Hiniker said. “Wendigo sounded cool and scary, so we went with Wendigo. Hopefully, you know, people see it move snow and they say, ‘wow that looks cool’”

The Wendigo uses a combination of a machine vision system and an inertial measurement unit to navigate up and down sidewalks and driveways.

The teams presented their designs to a panel of judges on Thursday evening at the Minnesota Science Museum. After safety checks on Friday night, the teams competed on the sidewalk-clearing course on Saturday and then took on the driveway course on Sunday.

Learn more about Dunwoody’s School of Engineering and Robotics & Manufacturing Department.

A look inside Dunwoody’s Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

The first cohort of Mechanical Engineering students began in August 2016, pioneering one of the College’s latest bachelor’s degree offerings.

When Dunwoody College of Technology announced the launch of its Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering last year, it did not want to ignore its hands-on, project-based, and industry-driven educational heritage.

Instead, Mechanical Engineering students were given an experienced instructor from industry; access to state-of-the-art technologies from companies like Carl Zeiss, Haas, MTS, and Stratasys; and a curriculum chalk-full of hands-on learning.

Dunwoody hires from industry for a hands-on education
Mechanical Engineering Instructor Jonathan Aurand works with a student in the Metrology Lab.

Mechanical Engineering Instructor Jonathan Aurand works with a student in the College’s Metrology Lab

The College has always developed its programs with the needs of industry in mind–and the Mechanical Engineering degree was no different.

So when it came time to hire an instructor for the program, Dunwoody looked for someone with robust industry experience to design a curriculum that could encourage students to translate theoretical knowledge into real-world practice.

Jonathan Aurand–Dunwoody’s Mechanical Engineering Instructor–fit the bill.

Aurand comes to Dunwoody with an experienced engineering background. He holds a master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering. He also worked as an Analysis Manager at HRST, Inc.–an engineering consulting firm providing service and products to the combined cycle and cogeneration industry–for nearly seven years, inspecting units, and creating solutions for design problems.

Aurand has always had an interest in teaching, and Dunwoody’s hands-on approach attracted him to the position.

“Some people are more research-based and don’t have any interest in actually building something,” said Aurand. “And if that’s you, then Dunwoody probably isn’t the best fit.”

The Dunwoody Difference

At Dunwoody, Mechanical Engineering students are not taking two years of general classes before applying to the engineering program. These students are registered for Mechanical Engineering from day one. And all their general theory classes are held alongside their hands-on labs, allowing students to see theory applied in action.

First-year Mechanical Engineering students complete an in-class, impromptu design challenge

Mechanical Engineering students complete an in-class, impromptu design challenge

During the first semester, Aurand has prepared in-class, impromptu design challenges for the students.

“I break the students up into three to four groups and lay out an engineering problem. They have to solve the problem using certain design requirements in a certain amount of time,” Aurand said. “They compete against one another to see whose design works best with a specific application in mind.”

The first of these design challenges was just two weeks into the first class. Teams of students were asked to improve on the simple paperclip design to see which group could successfully hold the most sheets of paper together.

“I’m really excited for these challenges,” Sierra Oden, first-year Mechanical Engineering student, said. “We’re doing something besides staring at a whiteboard and listening to a lecture.”

In addition to these smaller design challenges, Aurand will assign a larger project for the end of the semester. He will ask students to design a bridge in SolidWorks and actually build a prototype in the College’s Engineering Materials, Mechanics, and Metrology (M3) Lab. The objective of the project will be to support the greatest load while meeting Aurand’s design specifications.

Aurand’s first-semester curriculum also features field trips to engineering firms around the Twin Cities. And as the program progresses, he will assign collaborative projects that will require Mechanical Engineering students to work with students from other programs from across the College.

Pioneers of the program

The first Mechanical Engineering cohort is made up of 10 students. Four of those students are first-year college students, three transferred in from other colleges or universities, and the remaining three were previous Dunwoody students returning for a bachelor’s degree.

Mechanical Engineering student Sierra Oden

First-year Mechanical Engineering student Sierra Oden

Oden, a 2016 graduate of Park High School in Cottage Grove, wanted to become a pilot until she started working on cars and building ham radios out in the garage with her dad. That’s when she realized she liked to take things apart, learn how they work, and put them back together.

“When I first walked in [Dunwoody’s] machine shop, I was like, ‘Alright, I’m going here’” Oden said. “When I visited other colleges, they maybe had one mill, one CNC machine–just one of everything. And then I walked in here, and there was a class set of mills. And that’s not a thing anywhere else.”

Oden was also the captain of her high school’s robotics build team, where she met Edina High School alum and robotics team member Phoebe Sanders.

First-year Mechanical Engineering student Phoebe Sanders

First-year Mechanical Engineering student Phoebe Sanders

Sanders became interested in Mechanical Engineering during her senior year on Edina’s robotics team. She started looking for colleges outside of Minnesota with a goal to get as far away as possible.

In that year, Sanders’s parents encouraged her to attend Dunwoody’s Mechanical Engineering launch event at Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology to get her to start thinking about a backup school closer to home.

“At the launch event, I heard E.J. speak about the program, and I realized that this is all hands-on,” Sanders said. “I’m not going to have to take two years of generals before getting into my major. Why is this not at every school? Why isn’t this part of every program?”

Dunwoody’s School of Engineering

The launch of the bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering was just the first step towards building the College’s School of Engineering.

The Higher Learning Commission recently approved a Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering, launching in fall 2017. This degree is also being built with the College’s life-long values of hands-on learning, problem-solving, teamwork, and professionalism.

The Mechanical Engineering and Software Engineering degrees will be featured at Dunwoody’s next Open House from 3 to 7 p.m. on November 15, 2016. The $50 application fee is waived for students who decide to apply during the Open House. RSVP to this event at dunwoody.edu/admissions/open-house-rsvp/.

Learn more about Dunwoody’s School of Engineering.

Dunwoody College of Technology building

Dunwoody College of Technology launches Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

OCTOBER 5, MINNEAPOLIS, MN – Dunwoody College of Technology is now accepting applications for its new Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering, which will begin classes August 2017. The degree will prepare students to enter the field of engineering as software engineers. Software engineers design, develop, test and improve software applications for a variety of fields, including medical, financial, manufacturing, consumer, military, enterprise and other uses.

The degree will incorporate the College’s life-long values of hands-on learning, problem-solving, teamwork and professionalism. Prospective students and others interested in learning about Software Engineering or Mechanical Engineering or both are invited to RSVP for an Oct. 25 School of Engineering Information Session to be held on the Dunwoody campus.

Other Points of Note: 

  • Software Engineering students will benefit from the lab spaces and equipment already present on campus, including networking and web development deployment environments used by Computer Technology students and automated systems and electronic controls labs used by Robotics & Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering students.
  • The decision to launch a bachelor’s degree in software engineering was made in consultation with numerous industry leaders and professionals who highlighted a need for software engineers who combine both theoretical and practical skill sets and experience.
  • Software Engineering is the second degree offering the College’s School of Engineering, which launched with its first class of Mechanical Engineering students in August 2016.
  • Dunwoody is exploring which other engineering disciplines will join software and mechanical as the core majors for the School of Engineering. Currently electrical and civil engineering are at the top of the list.
  • Dunwoody has been approved to offer the degree by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education as well as the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. The commission’s web address and phone number are: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org and 312-263-0456.

Comment:

“As we explored the various options, Software Engineering made the most sense as the second major to add to our School of Engineering,” President Rich Wagner said. “The industry partners we spoke with saw a need for professionals who can design and lead complex software projects. We already supply many of the web developers and computer networking professionals hired by local industry. By adding software engineering we build on those current strengths to help address the need for IT professionals who can bring engineering thinking and skills to the field.”

More Information:

For more on Software Engineering and the School of Engineering: http://www.dunwoody.edu/engineering/

Media Contact:

William Morris, Director of Marketing & College Relations
wmorris@dunwoody.edu; 612-381-3367

For Admissions information:

dunwoody.edu/admissionsinfo@dunwoody.edu; 612-374-5800

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied education to more than 200,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers and become outstanding technicians, successful entrepreneurs and industry leaders. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, Dunwoody offers more than 30 certificate, associate’s degree and bachelor’s degree programs in the areas of Applied Management, Automotive, Computer Technology, Construction Sciences & Building Technology, Design & Graphics Technology, Engineering, Radiologic Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing, and Workforce Training & Continuing Education.

Dunwoody College of Technology launches Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dunwoody College of Technology now offering a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering

Dunwoody launches new School of Engineering
to help address Minnesota shortfall of engineers

September 23, 2015, MINNEAPOLIS, MN — Dunwoody College of Technology is now accepting applications for its new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program, which will begin classes August 2016. The degree will prepare students to enter the field of engineering as mechanical engineers and work to become licensed professional engineers.

While the degree will cover the same material as a traditional engineering education, the College will not be ignoring its educational heritage: coursework will be project-based so that theoretical-engineering principles are reinforced and experienced through hands-on creation and problem-solving. Teamwork and professionalism will also be emphasized.

Other points of note: 

  • Mechanical Engineering is the first degree offering in what will become a School of Engineering at the College.
  • Dunwoody is exploring which other engineering disciplines will join mechanical as the core majors for the School of Engineering.
  • Currently software, civil and electrical engineering are at the top of the list.
  • Mechanical Engineering students will benefit from the lab spaces already present on campus including HVAC, industrial controls, machining, and welding. Dunwoody recently created an engineering materials, mechanics and metrology lab that houses state-of-the-art technologies from companies like Carl Zeiss, Haas, MTS and Stratasys.
  • The decision to launch a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering was made in consultation with numerous industry leaders and professionals who highlight a need for not only more engineers in the Upper Midwest, but also engineers who combine both theoretical and practical skill sets and experience.
  • Dunwoody has been approved to offer the degree by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education as well as The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. The commission’s web address and phone number are: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org and 312-263-0456.

COMMENTS:

“Dunwoody is always looking for educational offerings that benefit industry and help bridge the skills gap, fit within our educational philosophy and expertise and, above all, provide good career opportunities for students,” President Rich Wagner said. “Our discussions with industry partners and professionals made it clear that Minnesota needed more licensed engineers with hands-on experience. We know how to do that. We have been doing so for more than 100 years. The creation of Dunwoody’s School of Engineering is the latest, significant step in our mission to help address that labor market skills gap both locally and across the country.”

“I’m excited to help launch this program,” said E.J. Daigle, dean of Robotics & Manufacturing. “Out in the workplace, technicians and engineers must be able to collaborate and work together. Dunwoody’s educational model is to replicate workplace conditions as much as possible and foster cross-program cooperation. To add Mechanical Engineering to all the other manufacturing and construction programs we offer makes a lot of sense.”

MORE INFORMATION:

For more on Mechanical Engineering and the School of Engineering: http://www.dunwoody.edu/engineering/

Contact:

William Morris, Director of Marketing & College Relations
wmorris@dunwoody.edu; 612-381-3367

E.J. Daigle, Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing
edaigle@dunwoody.edu; 612-381-8172

For Admissions information:

dunwoody.edu/admissions; info@dunwoody.edu; 612-374-5800

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied education to more than 200,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers and become outstanding technicians, successful entrepreneurs and industry leaders. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, Dunwoody offers more than 30 certificate, associate’s degree and bachelor’s degree programs in the areas of Applied Management, Automotive, Computer Technology, Construction Sciences & Building Technology, Design & Graphics Technology, Radiologic Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing, and Workforce Training & Continuing Education.

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