Tag Archives: Design and Graphic Technology

Design & Graphics Technology’s new iGen4 Diamond Edition digital press

DUNWOODY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY PARTNERS WITH MOTG – A XEROX COMPANY TO BRING HIGH-END DIGITAL PRINTING TO ITS DESIGN & GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY STUDENTS 

New Xerox iGen4 Press puts Dunwoody at the cutting edge of graphics arts education

Minneapolis, MN–Dunwoody College of Technology has demonstrated its commitment to serving the needs of the graphics and printing industry in Minnesota by working with MOTG/Xerox to acquire a Xerox iGen4™ Diamond Edition digital press.

“Print remains a crucial component of our industry, especially in the Twin Cities,” said Gerald Timmreck, manager of Design & Graphics Technology. “Dunwoody has served the graphics and printing industry for 100 years. Bringing in the Xerox iGen4 reaffirms the College’s commitment to providing a comprehensive, hands on graphic arts education so that the industry has the skilled workforce it needs to continue to thrive.”

“Our goal when this project started last year was to help create a strategy and curriculum that would put Dunwoody at the leading edge of Graphic Design and Digital Print Education,” said Larry Mustful, Production Solutions Manager – MOTG- a Xerox Company. “That is exactly what MOTG did by integrating the Xerox iGen4 and XMPie® Cross Media Suite to Dunwoody’s curriculum. Today, Dunwoody with the help of MOTG, will be able to teach students in an environment that demonstrates digital print from creation to fulfillment to deliver top talent press operators and designers to the upper mid-west marketplace.”

In addition to using it to train press operators, Design & Graphics Technology will incorporate theXerox iGen4™ Diamond Edition and the capabilities it brings with it into the curriculum for both the graphic design and pre-media technologies programs, thus providing students an applied, relevant, real-world education.

The decision to bring the iGen4 was guided by four major factors:

  1. The capabilities that come with the digital press plus Xerox’s other industry leading technologies. For example, the press also includes a C.P. Bourg BDFx Document Finisher, which is a fully automated in-line signature booklet maker.
  2. The fact that a large number of print companies and shops in the Twin Cities also use an iGen4
  3. The increasing relevance of digital printing to the field as well as rapid improvements in digital printing technology
  4. The opportunity to work with MOTG/Xerox to make sure that the curriculum Dunwoody offers its students reflects the latest advances in the field

The press will also help Dunwoody Print Services better serve its internal clients at the College which will lead to both cost savings and better produced print projects.

MOTG – A Xerox Company is among the Twin Cities’ largest and most respected consultancy firms specializing in workflow assessment and optimization. Our business is uniquely positioned to help companies understand true cost breakdown, asset deployment, usage patterns and volumes along with the development of sustainable working practices and continuous improvement initiatives. MOTG has successfully led Fortune 500 companies as well as small organizations – in every industry from healthcare to education and manufacturing – to achieve better financial results, improve operational efficiency and reduce environmental impact. XEROX®, XEROX and Design® are trademarks of Xerox in the United States and/or other countries. XMPie® is a trademark of XMPie, A Xerox Company.

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied technical education to more than 250,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, the College is currently celebrating its Centennial year.

Dunwoody students earn gold at 2013 SkillsUSA Minnesota Contest

Dunwoody students performed well again this year in the SkillsUSA Minnesota Contest held last weekend at various locations in the Twin Cities, including the Dunwoody campus.

The Collision students, advised by Bruce Graffunder and Bob Brandon, made a complete sweep of the awards, taking first through fourth place in the contest. Kevin Wendt advised two teams for the Web Design contest, and they placed first and second.

Overall, 16 Dunwoody students competed in seven contests, including Collision, Automotive Refinishing, HVAC, Computer Programming, Computer Maintenance, Web Design, and Internetworking.  The students medaled in five of the contests with three in first place, two in second place, three in third place, and two in fourth place.  The full results are:

 

Collision Repair– Advisors: Bruce Graffunder and Bob Brandon

1st: Erik Campion

2nd: Trevor Multhaup

3rd: Huey Lewis

4th: Andy LaRue

 

Internetworking – Advisors: Rob Bentz and Dave Mansheffer

1st: Donald Geer

 

Computer Web Design –Advisor: Kevin Wendt

1st Place Team:  Joe Packer and Brett Lidfors

2nd Place Team:  Martin Sheeks and Brady Skaurad

 

Automotive Refinishing – Advisors: Bruce Graffunder and Bob Brandon

3rd: Erik Campion

4th: Huey Lewis

 

Computer Maintenance – Advisor: Dave Mansheffer

3rd: Lee Reiners

 

The first place winners are eligible to compete at the national SkillsUSA competition in Kansas City, Mo., June 24–28.

Kevin Wendt and Bruce Graffunder will be attending the national competition as advisors for the contests.  Four Dunwoody faculty members are going to the national competition to judge: Lonny Lunn and Dave Duval for the Automotive competition, Heather Gay for the Teamworks competition, and Polly Friendshuh for the Electrical Construction Wiring competition.

For more information about SkillsUSA Minnesota, visit www.mnskillsusa.org.

 

SkillsUSA Minnesota is part of a national organization that serves over a quarter million student members annually, organized into more than 14,700 chapters and 54 state and territorial associations (including Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands). The Minnesota Association has offered leadership opportunities to over 200,000 student members since 1967, with a current annual membership of over 3,000. There are chapters in 29 technical colleges and 50 high schools or cooperative centers, with potential to serve many more. SkillsUSA is governed by a Board of Directors, elected from teachers that advise local chapters, and representing both the high school and college divisions and industry representatives. All programs are offered as integral to the curriculum.

 

 

Speeding to Indy for the Phoenix Challenge

The "Whole-in-One" -- the Dunwoody team's entry for the Phoenix Challenge

A team of four students from the Design & Graphics Technology department will be competing this weekend in the Phoenix Challenge, the Flexographic Technical Association’s annual product design and printing competition for colleges and universities that provide training in flexographic printing.

The competition will take place April 30 in Indianapolis, Indiana, and is the culmination of months of hard work to conceive, design, market, and print an original product using flexographic printing technology.

This year’s challenge was to create a promotional product for a golf fund-raising event. Dunwoody’s team created the Whole-In-One (pictured above) and have been working since last summer to prepare for the competition. The students who will be representing the entire team at the Phoenix Challenge are: Matt Christianson, Mitch Hanson, Mary Johnson and DJ Rickerd. They will not only be submitting the final products for judging but also giving a presentation before the judges on the processes they used to develop and print the product.

Instructors Shawn Oetjen and Tom Herold will also represent Dunwoody at the Phoenix Challenge. Dunwoody took first place at last year’s competition.

Dunwoody team takes first (twice!) in flexo competition

A team of Design and Graphic Technology students brought home two first place trophies from this year’s Phoenix Challenge last week. The students won first place in the Excellence in Design and Excellence in Execution categories at the Challenge, which promotes education in flexographic printing, a process that accomodates printing on a wide range of flexible materials.

“We are very proud of the team for bringing back two first place trophies. The effort put forth by our competition this year was amazing and our winning margin was slim,” Graphics and Printing Technologies Instructor Shawn Oetjen said. “The students put in countless hours on this project including weekends and many late nights, and we’re proud not only that won, but that they took advantage of all of the networking opportunities the conference and competition provided.”

The Phoenix Challenge is supported, in part, by flexography industry legends Ron and Katherine Harper, whose support of Dunwoody led the College to name its printing and graphic technology facilty the Harper Center for Graphics Technology in 2008.

The product challenge for this year’s teams involved re-branding or re-packaging of a campus coffee shop product in order give it a competitive advantage. After surveying students on their coffee shop buying habits and consumer preferences, Dunwoody’s team — Matt Grotz, David Mitchell, Josiah Mitchell, Trevor Olson and Cait Peschken — settled on repackaging a tea product. Their solution, dubbed Center of Gravatea, was to create a re-fillable tea pouch and two static clings that would be used for both marketing the product and the shop’s customer rewards program. The team did market research (including surveys) during the planning of the design, testing everything from the overall concept to the name and the design of the end products.

Because of their unique approach, the team had to come up with several clever solutions to the design and printing of the products. For example, because it was meant to be refillable with 5-6 tea bags, the team wanted the package to be extra-resistant to wear and tear. In addition to choosing a durable substrate (matte weld litho), they decided to print it at a 21 degree angle so that none the folds for the package were along the natural tear line for the substrate. Color management also brought some challenges, and the team meticulously documented the processes they used to create a consistent product that used the right color profiles — everything from prepping and cleaning the press to calibrating the plates used to deliver the ink.

The Phoenix Challenge was held earlier this month in Orlando, Fla., in conjunction with the Flexographic Technical Association Forum.