Dunwoody celebrates the launch of its Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering at Zeiss

On Wednesday, Oct. 21, Dunwoody held an event at Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology in Maple Grove to celebrate the launch of the College’s new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering beginning Fall 2016. Attendees included the program Steering Committee members, prospective students, and industry leaders.

Building the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the ground up

Dunwoody strives to provide students with a valuable, hands-on education with the needs of industry in mind. With guidance from a Steering Committee made up of working engineering professionals and educators, the four-year bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering is no exception.

“Dunwoody’s Mechanical Engineering curriculum was built from the ground up by engineering professionals working in the industry,” Dean of Robotics and Manufacturing E.J. Daigle said, “They know exactly what they’re looking for when they hire engineers and they’ve tailored our new program to give students the skills they will need to be successful in the workforce.”

The following steering committee members were awarded at the Launch Event in recognition of their contributions to the program:Marcin Bauza accepts award at the Mechanical Engineering Launch Event

Bob Bach, Dunwoody alumnus and current Mechanical Engineering faculty member at St. Thomas University

Greg Barlow, Vice President of Human Relations at TKDA Engineering

Marcin Bauza, Director of New Technology and Innovation at Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology

John Callahan, Director of Engineering at Polaris

Brian Sheposh, Principle Engineer at Johnstech Engineering

Rusty Steitz, Engineering Group Manager at TKDA Engineering

Scott Tolson, Engineer Manager at General Mills

Charlie Wennen, Manufacturing Engineer/Business Unit Lead at Wilson Tool

Dunwoody provides Degrees of Difference

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering is a traditional four-year engineering degree but with an additional emphasis on hands-on experiences, including time in the College’s Engineering Materials, Mechanics and Metrology Lab that houses state-of-the-art technologies from companies like Carl Zeiss, Haas, MTS and Stratasys.

“This experience won’t be like a traditional university engineering program,” E.J. said, “instead of learning theory in a large lecture hall with hundreds of students, our cohort class size will be no larger than 24 students and about one third of our curriculum is focused on hands-on experimentation in the lab.”

 Click here for more information on the College’s new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

Dunwoody Hosts Waterborne Spray Paint Training and Demonstration

Dunwoody’s Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing Department recently held a free, six-hour training session on aqueous paint systems for collision repair. The training was followed by an in-booth waterborne base coat and clear coat spot repair demonstration.

A photo of a Dunwoody classroom filled with event attendees

The purpose of the training was to inform the public—especially those in the automotive industry—the benefits of using, and properly applying, waterborne paint, instead of traditional solvent-based paint, on a newly repaired vehicle.

Nearly 30 individuals participated in the demo, including representatives from Heppner’s Auto Body & Collision Repair; Keystone Refinish (LKQ Corp); Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MNTAP); University of Northern Iowa Waste Reduction Center; Environmental Initiative Group; Kansas State University; PPG Automotive Refinish; and the City of Minneapolis were in attendance.

The training comes at a time when many auto repair shops are adopting the more environmentally friendly paint system technologies.

The Benefits of Using Waterborne Based Paint

Over the last few years, water-borne based paints have gained A photo of the waterborne paint expert talking at the event inside Dunwoody's waterborne spray paint booth traction around the U.S. and internationally. They have been proven to:

  • Produce better color matches;
  • Improve spot repairs;
  • Reduce solvent exposure;
  • Emit fewer air pollutants; and
  • Produce less hazardous waste–making them a popular choice in many auto repair shops.

Due to this shift in technology, Dunwoody installed a waterborne spray paint booth in its Collision Repair Shop earlier this year. The booth was made possible through several donations and a grant from the City of Minneapolis. Since then, the Automotive Collision & Repair program’s curriculum has drastically changed, focusing heavily on waterborne-paint application.

Event Attendees Learn Best Practices from Local Professionals

Dunwoody’s curriculum, additional grant opportunities from the City of Minneapolis, and waterborne paint application tips and techniques, were discussed at the event. Attendees were also able to participate in a virtual paint demonstration, which analyzes a person’s spray technique, rates their overall performance, and provides helpful feedback on how the painter can improve.

The program concluded with an actual waterborne spray paint demonstration inside Dunwoody’s paint booth.

Make the Switch to Waterborne: Learn MoreA photo of event attendees listening to the waterborne spray paint demonstration inside Dunwoody's spray paint booth

Dunwoody’s seminar was held in conjunction with the Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP) at the University of Minnesota; Environment
al Initiative; the City of Minneapolis; and MPCA’s Small Business Environmental Assistance Program (SBEAP). All organizations aim to improve air quality, eliminate waste, and better train local painters.

For more information on waterborne paint, contact Bruce Graffunder. For financial assistance opportunities to fund your shift to waterborne paint, contact the City of Minneapolis, MN Tap, or the Environmental Initiative Group.

Dunwoody & Mortenson Construction Win “Best Meal Award” at 2015 CANstruction

Team Donates 6,000 + Canned Goods to Second Harvest Heartland

IMG_2033-smallDunwoody’s Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department teamed up with Mortenson Construction for the 2015 Minneapolis CANstruction fundraiser—an annual event where participating teams build colossal structres made entirely out of cans of food.

The CANstruction team earned the “Best Meal” Award at the event, which was held at the Mall of America last month. The award is given annually to the team that uses the most nourishing, protein-packed food items.

Proceeds from the Minneapolis event were given to Second Harvest Heartland, the Upper Midwest’s largest hunger-relief organization.

There are over 150 CANstruction events held throughout the world each year.

Minnesota History Inspires 2015 CANstruction Sculpture Theme

IMG_8751-smallThe 2015 sculpture—designed and built by Interior Design and Construction Management students–was themed “Feast Like a Viking.” Cans of beans, tomatoes, vegetables and coconut milk made up the ship—complete with oars, a mast, sail and dragon head—while cans of tuna were used to represent ocean waves.

The CANstruction team chose the Viking theme because it represents the rich history of Minnesota. The voyage of Leif Erikson—who is often considered to be the first European to discover America—was recreated in 1927, with a final landed in Duluth, Minnesota. Journal entries from that expedition were kept and often detailed the crew’s difficulty in finding fresh fish and ripe vegetables.

This inspired the CANstruction team’s motto, which is “no-one’s ‘voyage through life’ should be limited by hunger”…especially today.

CANstruction Provides Students with Beneficial, Real World Experience

The entire project lasted about five weeks. During that time, Mortenson Construction and Dunwoody students not only designed the sculpture but also collected more than 6,000 cans of food.

Interior Design Principal Instructor and CANstruction Coordinator Cindy Martimo said that although the students were working with canned goods, the project did require students to use skills and best practices they would also perform on a real job.

“It required two very different departments to work together—especially on build day,” said Martimo. “Only five people could build at a time. So those who weren’t building had to provide various levels of support to the builders by unpacking boxes, passing cans, etc. The team had to practice time management, communicate with one another, follow a set of plans, and ultimately create the structure they designed.”

Click below to view a timelapse video of the CANstruction team assembling the sculpture at the event.

This is the fourth year the Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department has participated in a CANstruction event, and, according to Martimo, the students support and dollars raised grow each time.

“The event has really become a great opportunity for our students,” she said. “They get to be creative, design something and raise money for charity. In addition, their creations are judged by the very people who might someday offer them a job. The other teams out on the floor are all architecture and engineering firms. These are people that the students will be working with –or be hired by–one day. To have that kind of industry presence and to be able to add the CANstruction event to their resumes is very beneficial.”

Get Involved in CANstruction 2016

The Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department plans to continue the event next year. The project is open to all students in the Department. 

To get involved in CANstruction 2016, contact Cindy Martimo at cmartimo@dunwoody.edu.

 

A big thank you to this year’s sponsors: Mortenson Construction, Parsons Electric, Custom Drywall, and Ames Construction

Bachelor of Architecture Granted Initial Candidacy by National Architecture Accrediting Board

Dunwoody College of Technology’s Bachelor of Architecture has been granted initial candidacy by the National Architecture Accrediting Board (NAAB). The candidacy comes after a site visit last spring by a visiting team consisting of representatives from national academic and professional organizations.

 Initial candidacy marks the first two-year phase of the program’s professional accreditation.  Future phases include initial accreditation which will be considered after the program graduates its first class of students in 2018.  As a candidate school, Dunwoody Architecture will submit and publicy share its Architecture Program Report, Visiting Team Report, and Annual Statistical Reports.

Dunwoody Architecture offers the only five year bachelor of architecture degree in the state, providing students with a short, clear path to becoming a licensed, practicing architect. In addition, Dunwoody is one of the only schools in the nation that allows students with two-year architectural degrees to transfer into year three of a professional degree program. Its degree employs a hands-on approach to architectural education that starts with two years of focus on employability through proficiency in design and building technologies. The remaining three years provide advanced skills in design and professional leadership.  Applications for Fall 2016 are now open.

Dunwoody honors industry partners and volunteers at PAC dinner

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, Dunwoody College of Technology held its annual recognition dinner in honor of the hundreds of individuals who serve on one of the College’s Program Advisory Committees (PACs).

Each year, nearly 500 alumni and friends from business and industry volunteer their time to provide the feedback, insight and direction needed to ensure that programs and faculty remain up-to-date on emerging needs in the workplace.

In addition to thanking all of the volunteer committee members, the College also recognized three individuals with a Program Advisor Award.

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Architecture PAC member and Principal Emeritus of SALA Architects, Inc., Dale Mulfinger, FAIA, was selected to receive the Program Advisor Award in recognition of all of the time, talent, influence, counsel, energy and resources he has provided to Dunwoody’s Architecture Programs.

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Director of Field Operations for Ryan Companies, Jim “JP” Person, was presented with the Program Advisor Award in recognition of his passion, dedication and generosity providing industry support for the students of Dunwoody’s Construction Management Programs.

PACaward8W

Gary Shantz, Key Account Area Manager for Ideal Industries, Inc., was presented with a Program Advisor Award in recognition of his time, talent, dedication and generosity, which has benefited students in many Dunwoody programs.

This year, more than 250 individuals attended the PAC dinner, which was held in the McNamara Center at Dunwoody following the PAC meetings.

Women in Technical Careers Scholarship Provides More Than Financial Support

Women in Technical Careers (WITC) is Dunwoody’s new scholarship program designed to help women students succeed in technical degree programs at Dunwoody. Recipients of the scholarship receive $20,000 in scholarship funding and childcare assistance if needed.

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However, WITC is much more than just financial assistance. It also serves as a series of support services and networks–all designed to remove barriers that often prevent women from seeking non-traditional professions.

“Throughout their time at Dunwoody, WITC students participate in a cohort program, a mentorship program and monthly professional development workshops. They also have direct, one-on-one support from an advisor,” said Women’s Enrollment Coordinator Maggie Whitman. “While the scholarship funding helps, it’s these support services that really make a difference.”

IMG_1692Perhaps one of the most successful support services offered is the mentorship program. Modeled after research findings on the best way to support women students in a technical career, the program pairs each student with a local, successful woman in the same profession.

Mentors include women such as Claire Ferrara, Interim Executive Director of MEDICO; Cathy Heying, Founder of The Lift Garage; Karin McCabe, Workforce and Vendor Outreach Coordinator from McGough Construction; and many more.

“The mentorship program is important because it connects our students with women who are experienced at navigating workplacesIMG_1747 where few women work,” Whitman said. “Mentors can share job searching advice, industry information, and personal experiences that will prepare our students for their lives after graduation. It’s important for our students to hear this type of feedback and advice from women who have had similar life experiences. A simple, ‘I’ve been there, and I made it through…’ can go a long way.”

The mentorship program officially kicked off last month at a social event on campus. Students and their mentors were able to meet in person for the first time and get to know one another over appetizers and beverages.

“The students were very excited to meet so many professional women in their chosen careers,” Whitman said. “I also heard from the mentors that they appreciated the opportunity to network with other professional women. I think this program will be beneficial for everyone involved.”

IMG_1750Mentors and students will meet in person several more times throughout the next two years. They will also communicate regularly online.

The WITC scholarship was awarded to 22 women in 2015. The students are currently enrolled in programs like Automotive, Computer Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing and Construction Sciences & Building Technology.

The WITC students are expected to graduate in Spring of 2017.

Learn more about Women in Technical Careers.

The Design Library Introduces New Meet the Author Series

Larry Millett speaks at the first Meet the Author Series Event

On Thursday, Oct. 1, about 80 students and faculty gathered as Kyle Huberty – Dunwoody’s AIAS Chapter President – introduced Larry Millett at the Design Library’s first Meet the Author Series event. Larry Millett – prominent Minnesota author of both history and mystery books – focused on his body of published work, including his newest book, Minnesota Modern: Architecture and Life at Midcentury, available this fall. Larry Millett wrote many influential Minnesota architecture books including, Lost Twin Cities, the AIA Guide to the Twin Cities, and Once there were Castles.

About the new Meet the Author Series

Librarian Sarah Huber explains that the Design Library’s Meet the Author Series is intended to bring in authors to talk about topics related to the College’s design programs like interior design, architecture, graphic design, and any of the construction sciences areas. Because Larry Millett is a local author specializing in Minnesota’s architectural history, Sarah felt like he was the perfect fit to kick off the series. “I want to promote reading in students’ programs, whether it is books, ebooks, journal articles, blogs or web sites,” Sarah said, “I think the greatest outcome of reading in my field is that I feel inspired about what I do. My hope is that these author talks have that effect on students.”

There will be a new Meet the Author Series event each academic semester. Stay tuned for details about the Spring Semester author event. Until then, click here for more information on the Design Library’s resources and offerings.

Surly Brewing Company Provides Electrical Construction Design & Management Students with Electrical Tour

Second year Electrical Construction Design & Management students were provided with a behind-the-scenes tour of Surly Brewing Company earlier last month.

Electrical Construction Design & Management students smiling while on an electrical tour of Surly Brewing Company.

Students were able to see the many different electrical uses throughout Surly’s facility, from the industrial motors and sensors involved in the brewing lab to the various light fixtures inside the restaurant.

“Surly was a great building to tour simply because they do so much there,” Senior Instructor Nick Bohl said. “They of course have their brewery operations, but they also manage a restaurant with a kitchen; an event center; and space for kegging and canning. It was a great opportunity for students to see the many different aspects of construction, design and maintenance that go into a building like that–especially from an electrical standpoint.”

Tour guide referencing large machine to Electrical Construction Design & Management students while visiting Surly Brewing Company.This was just one of many site visits Bohl has planned for his students. Earlier this year, students also toured an electrical substation operated by Excel Energy. A trip to Monticello to visit a nuclear generating plant is also planned for later this semester. Towards the end of the program, students will even visit locations that directly pertain to their capstone projects.

“Each building we tour has a unique story and provides students with opportunities to ask questions and learn from an experienced professional in the industry,” said Bohl. “It’s an excellent way of showing students all that they’ll be capable of doing by the end of their program.”

Learn more about the Electrical Construction Design & Management program.