In Memoriam: President Emeritus Warren Phillips

Photo of Warren Phillips from 2014

President Emeritus Warren Phillips at Dunwoody’s Centennial Gala

Warren Phillips, who had a long and illustrious career at Dunwoody College of Technology and served as the College’s President from 1978 until 1989, died at his home in Athens, GA, on April 7, 2017. He was 90.

Phillips graduated from University of Wisconsin-Stout in 1950. He spent his early career involved in international education, including being part of a project team from Dunwoody that taught at and advised the Indonesian Technical Training Institute in Bandung, Indonesia. He also completed a study on the program for the Ford Foundation. By the end of the project, Dunwoody had administered more than $1.1 million in Ford Foundation Grants. He returned to Minnesota in 1960 and held several roles in Dunwoody’s International Services Division and other areas of the College.

In 1974, Phillips became Director of the Day School. He was named Executive Vice President of Dunwoody in 1977 and then became President just a year later.

A photo of Warren Phillips and his team during his tenure as president

Warren Phillips and his team during his tenure as president of Dunwoody

Throughout his long career at Dunwoody, Phillips instituted many of the events and programs that make the College what it is today. He started the 50-Year Club annual luncheon, which celebrates alumni who graduated half a century earlier; instituted the Alumni Achievement Award, Institutional Advancement Award, Partnership Award, and Alumni Entrepreneur Award; enhanced the Program Advisory Committees (which bring industry professionals on campus to advise faculty on curriculum and industry trends); and held the first alumni reunion in Arizona–all of which continue to this day. Phillips launched the Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP), which helps high school students from disadvantaged backgrounds explore technical fields and prepare for college as well as provides scholarship support for those who enroll at Dunwoody. YCAP has assisted more than 1,300 students since it began in 1988.

Phillips presided over a key period of change at Dunwoody as it responded to the computer revolution and other technology changes. He supported efforts to increase the enrollment of women and students of color. He worked with the Board of Trustees to establish a formal approach to seek private funding to support Dunwoody’s nonprofit mission. He led the 75th Anniversary Campaign, which raised $7.8 million in philanthropic gifts. After retirement, Phillips continued to support the College, including its successful bid for regional accreditation and its ongoing fundraising efforts. His passion for hands-on education and his dedication to Dunwoody’s employees and students was a hallmark of his career.

A memorial service for Warren Phillips will be held on May 13 in Excelsior, Minn.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial gifts be made to:

Dunwoody College of Technology
Warren & Arlene Phillips Endowed Scholarship Fund
818 Dunwoody Boulevard
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Dunwoody celebrates first graduating class of WITC Scholarship Program

Women In Technical Careers (WITC) helps 16 women begin their careers in technical fields

IMG_0581On May 20, 2017, 16 Dunwoody Women In Technical Career (WITC) students will walk across a stage ready to begin the next chapter of their lives. Dunwoody is thrilled to announce that the first cohort of the WITC Scholarship Program will graduate this month.

The program, which started in 2015, was created to help women students succeed in technical degrees and careers considered “non-traditional” for women. Recipients receive a scholarship of up to $20,000 as well as childcare stipends, monthly professional development workshops, a strong peer support network, and career-focused mentoring.

“It’s very exciting to see our first class of WITC graduate,” WITC Program Manager Maggie Whitman said. “It’s been an honor to watch these students gain technical skills and confidence, and now we are seeing them secure high-paying jobs and internships. Those were the exact outcomes we were hoping for.

“College is not easy for anyone, and when you compound that challenge with being a woman in a non-traditional field, parenting, working full-time, being a first-generation college student, and the many other identities and responsibilities these students juggle, it’s very impressive.”

WITC combats obstacles that prevent students from pursuing college
Dunwoody HVACR Systems Servicing Graduate Jessica Hertel

HVACR Systems Servicing Graduate Jessica Hertel

HVACR Systems Servicing student Jessica Hertel knows about juggling responsibilities well. A mother of two, Hertel shared that deciding to pursue post-secondary education wasn’t an easy decision.

“When I first applied for college, I was so incredibly nervous. I decided and undecided thousands of times. I didn’t know if I could actually do it,” Hertel said.

But after learning about the other women who would be a part of the cohort and the additional childcare support services WITC would provide, Hertel said she was sold.

“After I spoke with Maggie, I was so excited and ready to be here because I knew that no matter what happens I will have a group of women who support me—even if it’s just emotionally. Knowing that someone would be there was really essential for me.”

Dunwoody Automotive Service Technology Graduate Beverly White

Automotive Service Technology Graduate Beverly White

Scholarship dollars are what ultimately allowed Automotive Service & Technology Student Beverly White to attend Dunwoody—her first choice for college.

“Growing up, my parents never really showed a particular interest in school,” White said. “When I got older I had to find self-interest in school. I joined a college readiness program in high school, and we toured colleges all over Minnesota. To me, college was naturally just the next step after high school. I figured if I wasn’t 100% sure on what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, a more mature learning environment might help me narrow down my options.”

White found that learning environment at Dunwoody, but other schools with lower tuition were tempting. When White learned she was accepted into the scholarship program, her dream of attending Dunwoody became a reality.

“The WITC program alone is what [allowed me] to attend Dunwoody,” White said. “I was definitely interested, but I was weighing my options with other schools that I had close to full scholarships to, or a school I wouldn’t have to take out many loans for.

“When I received the [acceptance] email from Maggie, my decision was made,” she said.

Workshops prepare students for their careers, life after college
Dunwoody Web Programming & Database Development Graduate Siri Springer

Web Programming & Database Development Graduate Siri Springer

In addition to emotional and financial support while at Dunwoody, WITC also helps women prepare for life after college.

Every month the cohort meets to touch on different professional development topics that will help them navigate workplaces where few women work. Past workshop topics have included interview preparation, public speaking, interpersonal savviness, and workplace rights such as Equal Opportunity.

During their first year of the program, students were also paired with a local, successful woman in the same profession. This partnership allowed the cohort to see first-hand that enjoying—and thriving in—a typically male-dominated profession is completely possible.

Web Programming & Database Development student Siri Springer shared that these various workshops and presentations have helped her to “feel more at ease” about entering a field with few woman.

“It’s made me feel not so stressed about it,” Springer said. “It’s totally okay, and I have the impression that I’m the one probably making a bigger deal out of it. I just go on with my day and [know that no-one] is going to single me out.”

Workshops and various speakers have also helped Engineering Drafting & Design student Jazmine Darden to feel more informed and prepared for future life events like budgeting income and purchasing a home.

Dunwoody Engineering Drafting & Design Graduate Jazmine Darden

Engineering Drafting & Design Graduate Jazmine Darden

“You learn things that you don’t learn in the classroom,” Darden said. “It’s a time to talk about the things that we don’t think about day-to-day.”

Whitman shared that the goal of each activity—and the program as a whole—was to help women gain confidence in themselves, their work, and their career paths. And as the first cohort prepares to graduate, she believes that not only have they learned to believe in themselves, they’ve inspired others to do the same.

WITC graduates leave their marks at Dunwoody

“In the scholarship essays that they wrote two years ago, many of the women in the WITC program said they hoped to one day be role models for other women and girls,” Whitman said.

And whether they realize it or not they have done just that. Over the past two years, these students have seized opportunities to speak at events for young girls, be interviewed for news articles, testify before the Minnesota legislature, promote technical education in high schools, attend conferences, and mentor new Dunwoody students.

“I am proud of the tenacity of this group of students,” she said. “I know they will continue to pay it forward and shift perceptions surrounding women and the kinds of work we can do.”

Hertel, White, Springer, and Darden will graduate on May 20, 2017, at 11 a.m. The Commencement Ceremony will be held at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Learn more about Dunwoody Commencement.

Apply for WITC.

Mock Interviews gear Dunwoody students up for life after college

Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students learn many life skills during their monthly workshops. The latest month: how to interview for a job.

IMG_0989On Thursday, April 6, Dunwoody College of Technology Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students brushed off their résumés and prepared for mock interview sessions with the City of Lakes Rotary Club.

The Rotary Club has been conducting mock interviews with YCAP students for several years.

“This is one of the Rotary Club’s projects that they really take great pride in,” said Associate Director of Special Initiatives, YCAP Peggy Quam. “It’s their way to give back and stay connected to YCAP.”

YCAP students find mock interviews a valuable learning experience

IMG_1036The mock interviews took place in the College’s Decker Auditorium where each student was paired up with a Rotary Club member for 25 minutes. During that time, students conducted an informational interview and then collected feedback from their partner on their skills. Students interviewed with three different professionals throughout the evening.

“It was a really good learning experience for us,” YCAP student Donald Posterick said. “It was good for getting used to how to act in an interview and strengthening the skills I need to talk to people.”

IMG_0979YCAP Student Erik Ernst had only done a few interviews in the past, and those interviewers hadn’t offered any feedback. “So it was interesting to hear what I had done well and what I needed to work on in the future,” Ernst said.

Preparing for a mock interview

To prepare, students were asked to refine their résumé with Associate Director of Career Services Rob Borchardt.

Borchardt works one-on-one with students every day to make sure they feel confident for their upcoming interviews and their résumés are attractive to employers.

IMG_0982“A well-written résumé is the key to a job interview, so it’s vital that students are able to communicate their skills, experience, and strengths,” Borchardt said. “Dunwoody students are top candidates and a great resume provides a major leg up in any of our students’ job searches.”

About YCAP

Since 1988, Dunwoody College’s YCAP has helped more than 1,300 students gain access to a college education.

YCAP’s mission is to enhance the career opportunities of underrepresented youth by empowering them to graduate from high school and earn a degree from Dunwoody.

YCAP students complete a six-week paid summer internship filled with career exploration, field trips, and college-readiness courses. After the camp, students are eligible for a $20,000 scholarship to attend Dunwoody.

Learn more at dunwoody.edu/ycap.

Polar Explorer Will Steger to Keynote Dunwoody College 2017 Commencement

Will Steger headshotDunwoody College of Technology is pleased to announce that Will Steger– environmentalist, author, educator, and explorer–will be the keynote speaker at the College’s Commencement on Saturday, May 20, at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Steger is known for his numerous polar expeditions, deep understanding of the environment, and his efforts to raise international awareness to environmental threats. Steger has been an eyewitness to climate change. He has traveled tens of thousands of miles over 50 years leading teams on some of the most significant polar expeditions in history.

Steger received his B.S. in Geology and M.A. in Education at the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN. Steger joined Amelia Earhart, Robert Peary and Roald Amundsen in receiving the National Geographic Society’s prestigious John Oliver La Gorce Medal in 1995. In 1996, he became the National Geographic Society’s first Explorer-in-Residence. He has received the Explorers Club Finn Ronne Memorial and Lowell Thomas Awards and the Lindbergh Award. Steger is the author of four books: Over the Top of the World, Crossing Antarctica, North to the Pole, and Saving the Earth and has received several Honorary Doctorate degrees.

Steger is the founder of two nonprofits, the Will Steger Wilderness Center in Ely, MN, dedicated to innovation and leadership in a wilderness setting; and Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy, headquartered in Minneapolis, with a focus on engaging educators, youth, and communities in solutions to climate change.

 

Engineering Drafting & Design graduate Danny Treat to speak at Dunwoody Commencement

2017 Commencement student speaker Danny TreatDunwoody College of Technology is pleased to announce that this year’s student speaker for Commencement will be Engineering Drafting & Design graduate Danny Treat.

Treat has always had a lot of interests in life –Dunwoody College of Technology has given him the focus and drive he needed to steer those interests onto a promising career path.

Growing up in San Diego, Treat struggled with traditional high school but then found success at a charter school that emphasized real work experience.

With interests that spanned a wide spectrum of fields, Treat explored multiple options at a community college before admitting he just wasn’t ready for more school.

Treat was interested in several service-learning programs available through non-profit organizations. He eventually settled on a three-month commitment with Catholic Charities, helping rebuild homes in New Orleans. He continued that work with AmeriCorps, eventually serving as one of the project managers and volunteer coordinators.

A hands-on learner, Treat enjoyed the carpentry and construction aspects of the job, but he also liked the idea of helping design a project. With those interests in mind, Treat enrolled at the University of New Orleans in the naval architecture and marine engineering program.

But the four-year, traditional college model wasn’t a good fit. “There was no ‘hands-on’ learning,” Treat said, adding that it wasn’t until the final year of the program that you got to do the “fun stuff.”

By this time, Treat had met his now fiancée who was from the Twin Cities and wanted to move back to start her teaching career.

After moving to Minneapolis Treat found work installing closets and looked into joining the electrical union. Then his fiancée’s mother, who happens to be a career counselor, suggested Dunwoody as an option.

So Treat attended an Open House and checked out a number of programs eventually landing on Engineering Drafting & Design.

“When I saw the 3D printers and heard about the program, I knew that was it,” Treat said.

It was a decision he never regretted. “I felt more at home here than I did at either the community college or the four-year university,” Treat said. “I connected more.”

Treat was impressed with all of the hands-on work and has excelled in all of his coursework. Treat is also one of the 2016-17 Owen Scholarship recipients.

“I haven’t had a day when I haven’t wanted to come to school,” Treat said. After completing his current internship with Proto Labs, an on-demand manufacturer of custom prototypes using CNC machining, injection molding, and 3D printing, Treat will start a new position as a Drafter for Daikin, one of the world’s leading air conditioning manufacturers.

Commencement will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 20, at the Minneapolis Convention Center

Dunwoody College offers unique summer camp opportunities

Looking for something to do this summer? Dunwoody College of Technology is delighted to offer the following camp opportunities for 2017:

STEM Camp sponsored by Boston Scientific: June 19-22, 2017

STEM camp students and Dunwoody instructors outside the College's main entrance.

Dunwoody College of Technology STEM Camp is for high school students entering grades 10-12 in fall 2017.

During STEM Camp, you’ll:

  • Tour Boston Scientific on the first day (transportation provided) and attend a career panel of BSC employees in STEM jobs.
  • Design, build, and program a Smart Flashlight using SolidWorks CAD software, Stratasys 3D printers, CNC machining, and Arduino code.
  • Use engineering design processes in a team to compete with other teams for engineering dominance while applying physical sciences concepts to real-world scenarios.
  • Explore how building designs – both electronically and physically – use STEM to help shape the backdrops of our lives. You’ll explore architecture and civil engineering by making a physical model during a tower design activity and also learn how the sun shapes cities by using SketchUp Make software to digitally study Downtown Minneapolis.

Apply by May 5, 2017


Discover Interior Design Camp: June 19-22, 2017

IDSNCAMP2016The Interior Design Camp is for high school students entering grades 10-12 in fall 2017.

Students are taught by professional designers from the design community and those who teach in our undergraduate program. Participants will study color, materials, architectural drawing, and digital media as well as visit design firms and beautiful spaces around the Twin Cities.

Click here to register!


Arts-n-Crafts, Robots & Computing Camp: July 17-21, 2017

Photo of students with robotThe Arts-n-Crafts, Robots & Computing Camp is for students entering grades 6-8 in fall 2017.

Hosted by Dunwoody’s Computer Technology department, campers will learn the basics of computing through arts and crafts projects. Build and program robots with LEGO Mindstorms ®, learn about Artbotics, and program with Scratch and other tools. Dunwoody faculty and staff will lead the activities.

Click here to register!


Rosie’s Girls: July 25, 2017

Photo Credit: Girl Scouts River ValleysIn partnership with Dunwoody College of Technology, Girls Scouts River Valleys is for girls entering grades 6-8 in fall 2017.

Rosie’s Girls is a unique educational experience inspired by Rosie the Riveter designed to build strong, confident girls through hands-on learning.

At this day-long workshop, you will practice problem-solving, experiment with technology, develop leadership and communication skills, and take positive risks by trying new things. Led by female Dunwoody instructors, you’ll explore a range of educational and career options in a girl-centered environment and work with a variety of materials—including wood and metal—as well as learn about sustainable design and renewable energy. You will also help design and give voice to future Rosie’s Girls programming.

Click here to register!


Learn more at dunwoody.edu/summercamp.

Two Dunwoody students advance to 2017 SkillsUSA National Competition

Dunwoody brings home 6 medals in 2017 State Competition.

Architectural Drafting & Design student Eli Abnet and Electrical Construction & Maintenance student Matthew Longendyke are headed to Louisville, Ky., for the National Leadership and Skills Conference (NLSC) thanks to their first place wins at the 2017 SkillsUSA MN Competition earlier this month.

Abnet won the Architecture portion of the competition. Longendyke took first in the Related Technical Math contest.

In addition to the two gold medals, Dunwoody students also brought home a 2nd place medal in Related Technical Math (Andrew Schmitz, Electrical Construction Design & Management), 2nd place medal in Architecture (Reid Schumacher, Architectural Drafting & Design), and two 3rd place medals in Collision and Automotive Refinishing (John Spartz, Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing).

In total, 12 Dunwoody students competed in six different areas in the 2017 competition.

Abnet and Longendyke will join more than 6,000 other technical education students—all state winners—at the National Competition Wednesday, June 21, and Thursday, June 22.

The event is open to the public and free of charge.

To get involved in SkillsUSA 2018, contact Dunwoody SkillsUSA Coordinator Polly Friendshuh at 612.381. 8107 or pfriendshuh@dunwoody.edu.

Discover the Difference in Dunwoody’s Design and Graphics Technology curriculum

Dunwoody’s Design and Graphics Technology Department is known for its hands-on, applied approach to design.

“Our students are making things all the time. They’re not just working on a laptop or a computer. They’re running a real printing press or a CAD table or any of the other pieces of equipment that we might have,” Principal Pre-Media Technologies Instructor Pete Rivard said. “So we feel that the learning goes all the way to the bone”

Learn more at dunwoody.edu/graphics.