Bachelor of Architecture Granted Initial Candidacy by National Architecture Accrediting Board

Dunwoody College of Technology’s Bachelor of Architecture has been granted initial candidacy by the National Architecture Accrediting Board (NAAB). The candidacy comes after a site visit last spring by a visiting team consisting of representatives from national academic and professional organizations.

 Initial candidacy marks the first two-year phase of the program’s professional accreditation.  Future phases include initial accreditation which will be considered after the program graduates its first class of students in 2018.  As a candidate school, Dunwoody Architecture will submit and publicy share its Architecture Program Report, Visiting Team Report, and Annual Statistical Reports.

Dunwoody Architecture offers the only five year bachelor of architecture degree in the state, providing students with a short, clear path to becoming a licensed, practicing architect. In addition, Dunwoody is one of the only schools in the nation that allows students with two-year architectural degrees to transfer into year three of a professional degree program. Its degree employs a hands-on approach to architectural education that starts with two years of focus on employability through proficiency in design and building technologies. The remaining three years provide advanced skills in design and professional leadership.  Applications for Fall 2016 are now open.

Dunwoody honors industry partners and volunteers at PAC dinner

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, Dunwoody College of Technology held its annual recognition dinner in honor of the hundreds of individuals who serve on one of the College’s Program Advisory Committees (PACs).

Each year, nearly 500 alumni and friends from business and industry volunteer their time to provide the feedback, insight and direction needed to ensure that programs and faculty remain up-to-date on emerging needs in the workplace.

In addition to thanking all of the volunteer committee members, the College also recognized three individuals with a Program Advisor Award.


Architecture PAC member and Principal Emeritus of SALA Architects, Inc., Dale Mulfinger, FAIA, was selected to receive the Program Advisor Award in recognition of all of the time, talent, influence, counsel, energy and resources he has provided to Dunwoody’s Architecture Programs.


Director of Field Operations for Ryan Companies, Jim “JP” Person, was presented with the Program Advisor Award in recognition of his passion, dedication and generosity providing industry support for the students of Dunwoody’s Construction Management Programs.


Gary Shantz, Key Account Area Manager for Ideal Industries, Inc., was presented with a Program Advisor Award in recognition of his time, talent, dedication and generosity, which has benefited students in many Dunwoody programs.

This year, more than 250 individuals attended the PAC dinner, which was held in the McNamara Center at Dunwoody following the PAC meetings.

Women in Technical Careers Scholarship Provides More Than Financial Support

Women in Technical Careers (WITC) is Dunwoody’s new scholarship program designed to help women students succeed in technical degree programs at Dunwoody. Recipients of the scholarship receive $20,000 in scholarship funding and childcare assistance if needed.


However, WITC is much more than just financial assistance. It also serves as a series of support services and networks–all designed to remove barriers that often prevent women from seeking non-traditional professions.

“Throughout their time at Dunwoody, WITC students participate in a cohort program, a mentorship program and monthly professional development workshops. They also have direct, one-on-one support from an advisor,” said Women’s Enrollment Coordinator Maggie Whitman. “While the scholarship funding helps, it’s these support services that really make a difference.”

IMG_1692Perhaps one of the most successful support services offered is the mentorship program. Modeled after research findings on the best way to support women students in a technical career, the program pairs each student with a local, successful woman in the same profession.

Mentors include women such as Claire Ferrara, Interim Executive Director of MEDICO; Cathy Heying, Founder of The Lift Garage; Karin McCabe, Workforce and Vendor Outreach Coordinator from McGough Construction; and many more.

“The mentorship program is important because it connects our students with women who are experienced at navigating workplacesIMG_1747 where few women work,” Whitman said. “Mentors can share job searching advice, industry information, and personal experiences that will prepare our students for their lives after graduation. It’s important for our students to hear this type of feedback and advice from women who have had similar life experiences. A simple, ‘I’ve been there, and I made it through…’ can go a long way.”

The mentorship program officially kicked off last month at a social event on campus. Students and their mentors were able to meet in person for the first time and get to know one another over appetizers and beverages.

“The students were very excited to meet so many professional women in their chosen careers,” Whitman said. “I also heard from the mentors that they appreciated the opportunity to network with other professional women. I think this program will be beneficial for everyone involved.”

IMG_1750Mentors and students will meet in person several more times throughout the next two years. They will also communicate regularly online.

The WITC scholarship was awarded to 22 women in 2015. The students are currently enrolled in programs like Automotive, Computer Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing and Construction Sciences & Building Technology.

The WITC students are expected to graduate in Spring of 2017.

Learn more about Women in Technical Careers.

The Design Library Introduces New Meet the Author Series

Larry Millett speaks at the first Meet the Author Series Event

On Thursday, Oct. 1, about 80 students and faculty gathered as Kyle Huberty – Dunwoody’s AIAS Chapter President – introduced Larry Millett at the Design Library’s first Meet the Author Series event. Larry Millett – prominent Minnesota author of both history and mystery books – focused on his body of published work, including his newest book, Minnesota Modern: Architecture and Life at Midcentury, available this fall. Larry Millett wrote many influential Minnesota architecture books including, Lost Twin Cities, the AIA Guide to the Twin Cities, and Once there were Castles.

About the new Meet the Author Series

Librarian Sarah Huber explains that the Design Library’s Meet the Author Series is intended to bring in authors to talk about topics related to the College’s design programs like interior design, architecture, graphic design, and any of the construction sciences areas. Because Larry Millett is a local author specializing in Minnesota’s architectural history, Sarah felt like he was the perfect fit to kick off the series. “I want to promote reading in students’ programs, whether it is books, ebooks, journal articles, blogs or web sites,” Sarah said, “I think the greatest outcome of reading in my field is that I feel inspired about what I do. My hope is that these author talks have that effect on students.”

There will be a new Meet the Author Series event each academic semester. Stay tuned for details about the Spring Semester author event. Until then, click here for more information on the Design Library’s resources and offerings.

Surly Brewing Company Provides Electrical Construction Design & Management Students with Electrical Tour

Second year Electrical Construction Design & Management students were provided with a behind-the-scenes tour of Surly Brewing Company earlier last month.

Electrical Construction Design & Management students smiling while on an electrical tour of Surly Brewing Company.

Students were able to see the many different electrical uses throughout Surly’s facility, from the industrial motors and sensors involved in the brewing lab to the various light fixtures inside the restaurant.

“Surly was a great building to tour simply because they do so much there,” Senior Instructor Nick Bohl said. “They of course have their brewery operations, but they also manage a restaurant with a kitchen; an event center; and space for kegging and canning. It was a great opportunity for students to see the many different aspects of construction, design and maintenance that go into a building like that–especially from an electrical standpoint.”

Tour guide referencing large machine to Electrical Construction Design & Management students while visiting Surly Brewing Company.This was just one of many site visits Bohl has planned for his students. Earlier this year, students also toured an electrical substation operated by Excel Energy. A trip to Monticello to visit a nuclear generating plant is also planned for later this semester. Towards the end of the program, students will even visit locations that directly pertain to their capstone projects.

“Each building we tour has a unique story and provides students with opportunities to ask questions and learn from an experienced professional in the industry,” said Bohl. “It’s an excellent way of showing students all that they’ll be capable of doing by the end of their program.”

Learn more about the Electrical Construction Design & Management program.

Students Design and Build Weed Whip Prototypes Using Stratasys 3D Printers

Students pose with their weed whip prototypesOn Wednesday, Sept. 30, six groups of second-year Mechanical Design students presented their custom-designed weed whip projects and demonstrated their prototypes on Dunwoody’s lawn. Instructor Alex Wong gave each group the motor and wiring from a standard Black and Decker weed whip, a budget of $200, and about five weeks to make design improvements on the store-bought Black and Decker weed whip model.

“In addition to the professional skills required for the 3D modeling and documentation, the students also had to do a lot of problem-solving,” Alex said. The students were required to do research and develop sketches of their own weed whip concept. When this initial design process was complete, students brought their sketches to life using parts they made with the Stratasys 3D printers in the College’s Metrology Lab.Student tests weed whip prototype

Mac Cameron – an Applications Engineer at Stratasys – came to watch the demonstrations of the students’ projects. “I travel all over the place to see what people are doing with our printers,” he said, “but this is one of the cooler projects I’ve seen on a college campus.”

In addition to the project guidelines, Alex also graded students on criteria like teamwork, decision-making skills, and quality of the documentation.

Click here for more information on the Engineering Drafting & Design program.

Dunwoody-Built Fish House To Be Raffled at Rebuilding Together Twin Cities Fundraiser

Exterior photo of Dunwoody College student-built fish house.Over the last seven months, Dunwoody students and faculty have been building a one-of-a-kind, luxury fish house. The house is part of a fundraising project for Rebuilding Together Twin Cities, which makes critical home repairs for Twin Cities’ homeowners in need.

The 128 square-foot house was designed and built by Dunwoody students and faculty from Construction Management, Interior Design, Welding, and HVAC Installation & Residential Service programs.

The fish house will be raffled at Rebuilding Together Twin Cities’ Flannel Fling event on Friday, Oct. 30, at Nicollet Island Pavilion. The fundraiser begins at 6 p.m. and will also include a live and silent auction; local craft beer; dinner; live entertainment; games and much more.

Raffle tickets for the fish house are $20 each with proceeds benefiting Rebuilding Together Twin Cities and Dunwoody College of Technology.

To purchase tickets, or for more information, contact Heather Gay at

Dunwoody College of Technology launches Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering


Dunwoody College of Technology now offering a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering

Dunwoody launches new School of Engineering
to help address Minnesota shortfall of engineers

September 23, 2015, MINNEAPOLIS, MN — Dunwoody College of Technology is now accepting applications for its new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program, which will begin classes August 2016. The degree will prepare students to enter the field of engineering as mechanical engineers and work to become licensed professional engineers.

While the degree will cover the same material as a traditional engineering education, the College will not be ignoring its educational heritage: coursework will be project-based so that theoretical-engineering principles are reinforced and experienced through hands-on creation and problem-solving. Teamwork and professionalism will also be emphasized.

Other points of note: 

  • Mechanical Engineering is the first degree offering in what will become a School of Engineering at the College.
  • Dunwoody is exploring which other engineering disciplines will join mechanical as the core majors for the School of Engineering.
  • Currently software, civil and electrical engineering are at the top of the list.
  • Mechanical Engineering students will benefit from the lab spaces already present on campus including HVAC, industrial controls, machining, and welding. Dunwoody recently created an engineering materials, mechanics and metrology lab that houses state-of-the-art technologies from companies like Carl Zeiss, Haas, MTS and Stratasys.
  • The decision to launch a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering was made in consultation with numerous industry leaders and professionals who highlight a need for not only more engineers in the Upper Midwest, but also engineers who combine both theoretical and practical skill sets and experience.
  • Dunwoody has been approved to offer the degree by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education as well as The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. The commission’s web address and phone number are: and 312-263-0456.


“Dunwoody is always looking for educational offerings that benefit industry and help bridge the skills gap, fit within our educational philosophy and expertise and, above all, provide good career opportunities for students,” President Rich Wagner said. “Our discussions with industry partners and professionals made it clear that Minnesota needed more licensed engineers with hands-on experience. We know how to do that. We have been doing so for more than 100 years. The creation of Dunwoody’s School of Engineering is the latest, significant step in our mission to help address that labor market skills gap both locally and across the country.”

“I’m excited to help launch this program,” said E.J. Daigle, dean of Robotics & Manufacturing. “Out in the workplace, technicians and engineers must be able to collaborate and work together. Dunwoody’s educational model is to replicate workplace conditions as much as possible and foster cross-program cooperation. To add Mechanical Engineering to all the other manufacturing and construction programs we offer makes a lot of sense.”


For more on Mechanical Engineering and the School of Engineering:


William Morris, Director of Marketing & College Relations; 612-381-3367

E.J. Daigle, Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing; 612-381-8172

For Admissions information:;; 612-374-5800

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied education to more than 200,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers and become outstanding technicians, successful entrepreneurs and industry leaders. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, Dunwoody offers more than 30 certificate, associate’s degree and bachelor’s degree programs in the areas of Applied Management, Automotive, Computer Technology, Construction Sciences & Building Technology, Design & Graphics Technology, Radiologic Technology, Robotics & Manufacturing, and Workforce Training & Continuing Education.