Dunwoody College Intern Expo and Print Showcase 2010

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On Thursday, Feb. 18, Dunwoody College hosted its Graphics and Printing Technology InternExpo. This event was a reverse job fair where the students are at booths with examples of their work and their resumes and professionals browse the lot to find their next company interns. The InternExpo began at 9 a.m. in The Hub. Click here to view photos of each student showcased at the event.Evenson,Matthew

In conjunction with the InternExpo, Dunwoody hosted the Printing Industry of Minnesota’s (PIM) 2010 Print Showcase from 1 to 5 p.m. in the Decker Auditorium. The Showcase brought together printers, designers, print buyers, paper companies and advertisers to discuss latest on print, paper and finishing. For more information, visit the PIM 2010 Print Showcase website.

Full Schedule
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. — Intern Expo in The Hub/Carlson Commons
1 – 5 p.m. — Print Showcase in the Decker Auditorium
2:15 – 3:00 p.m. — Session: Target Marekting Using VDP presented by Dr. John Leininger of Clemson University in the Holden Center
3:15 – 4:15 p.m. — Session: Pixel’s vs. Paper in the Holden Center
4:15 – 4:45 p.m. — Session: Turning Green presented by Paul Gutkowski, PIM Director of Safety & Environmental Services in the Holden Center

Litchfield Independent Review features story on Custom Training

The Jan. 28 edition of the Litchfield Independent Review ran a story about Dunwoody Custom Training training four Litchfield area manufacturers to be able to do their own repairs of their equipment, especially PLC units (Programmable Logic Controller). The course was put together in collaboration with the Litchfield Chamber of Commerce.

Barb Obershaw, the Dunwoody Custom Training account executive who help put together the class, explained: “This is not our typical approach. Typically, you go in and work with one company. We decided that because they were all Chamber members, this would help spread the cost of the training over four bisnesses and make it much more cost effective for them. We’re proud of this model, and this is a model we intend to use in other communities, as well.”

The companies anticipate that the PLC training will save them quite a bit of money since previously they had to pay for technicians to fly in from out-of-state to do many of their repairs.

The Litchfield Independent Review article is not available online. It was featured on Page 1A of the Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 edition and continued in to the Business section on page 7A. More on custom training offerings is availalbe on the Dunwoody Custom Training website.

Dunwoody students place second in Residential Construction Management Competition

Residential Construction ManagementDunwoody’s Residential Construction Management Competition team won second place at the annual National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) International Builder’s Show in mid January. The five second year students – John Chapel, Construction Project Supervision; Dustin Curly, Construction Project Supervision; Kyle Fitzpatrick, Architectural Drafting and Estimating; Emily Silvan, Architectural Drafting and Estimating; and Oua Vang, Architectural Drafting and Estimating – were tasked with completing a management proposal for a multi-story, single-family residence for the St Louis, Missouri, area that met the NAHB Green Standard of Silver. The team was provided with partial plans and elevations for the home.

With the help of coaches Dean Soderbeck, Architectural Drafting and Estimating Instructor; Bob Skarsten, Construction Project Supervision Instructor; and Charlie Radloff, Architectural Drafting and Estimating Instructor; the team began working on their solution in September 2009. The team developed a set of working drawings to describe the construction, a pricing schedule to cost the labor and material, and a schedule of construction with a day-by-day description of the time. These materials were assembled in to a project binder and mailed to the judges in early December. With the support of the Builders Association of the Twin Cities (BATC), the team then traveled to the show to present their project to judges.

The NAHB Student Chapters Residential Construction Management Competition is one of the highlights at the annual NAHB International Builders’ Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. The competition gives students the opportunity to apply the skills learned in the classroom to a real construction project by completing a management proposal. The proposals were submitted to a group of construction company executives who act as judges. During the convention, students presented and defended their proposals to the judges in front of an audience.

The skillful use of their understanding of “green” and sustainable construction, along with superb 3d modeling created a presentation that one judge commented as “very professional”. In addition to winning 2nd place, John Chapel was awarded the NAHB Student Chapter “Outstanding Student Award.”

Full Results:

First Place
Utah Valley University (Orem, UT)

Second Place
Dunwoody College of Technology (Minneapolis, MN)

Third Place
Brigham Young University-Idaho (Rexburg, ID)

State Farm donates vehicle to Dunwoody Collision Program

Chevy Cavalier front right view before shot State Farm Insurance Company is once again donating a repairable vehicle to Dunwoody College’s Collision Repair & Refinishing Program. The company has donated five vehicles over the past five years. This year’s vehicle is a 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier LS and will be worked on by our Collision students over the next eight months.

The donated vehicles provide hard to find structural repair training and advanced vehicle systems training for our students. After Collision students and faculty repair them, the vehicles are sold. State Farm stipulates that any net profit on the vehicles they donate be used for equipment for the Collision Program. For example, profits from recent donations helped the Program purchase a squeeze type resistance spot welder last year.

A representative from State Farm said: “These donations are a great example of how State Farm is working with the Auto Body repair program at Dunwoody. This collaboration supports improvement in the collision repair process — something that benefits our customers, repairers and State Farm. It also makes a positive impact on the environment. Donating vehicles helps reduce the amount of waste added to our nation’s landfills.

State Farm is committed to meeting the needs of our communities, and this program is a great opportunity to meet a need and make a difference.”

Dunwoody’s connection with State Farm began with alumnus Bob Roiger, an estimatics trainer for the company. Roiger graduated in 1978 from the Collision Repair and Refinishing program. State Farm also helps with the Skills USA contest for Collision Repair.

The Collision Program will put the profit from the sale of the repaired and refinished Cavalier towards a computerized measuring system and is looking to partner with another repairable vehicle donation source per year to help reach that goal sooner.

Click here for more photos of Collision student projects. We’ll post the after shots of the Cavalier once it’s complete about 8 months from now.

Star Tribune column features Dunwoody alumnus, deployed serviceman Kofi Law

Gail Rosenblum’s Star Tribune column today featured Kofi Law, who graduated from Dunwoody’s Automotive program. The column focused on his journey from citizen of Togo to Minnesota resident (and Dunwoody student) to American citizen and U.S. serviceman. It also featured comments from Student Services Advisor Molly Malone.

Rosenblum writes:

Law, 28, had dreamed of becoming a U.S. citizen since he was a boy. He moved to Minneapolis in January 2003 from Togo (where the average daily temperature is 80 degrees), taught himself English, graduated from Dunwoody College of Technology and gathered the required paperwork to become a new American.

A few days after a joyful citizenship celebration at Bethel University in Arden Hills in August, Law headed to Fort McCoy in Wisconsin for premobilization training.

Later she reports on a conversation she had with Molly:

Molly Malone Docken, student services adviser at Dunwoody, calls him “the nicest guy in the whole world,” and a model student to boot. “He would come early and stay late,” she said. “Whenever he had questions, he would ask. When he got nervous, he’d seek tutoring. Deadlines looming? He never missed one. Then he would follow up. We would love to clone him.”

For more, click here to read the full column on the Star Tribune website.