Category Archives: Videos

3D printing: more than just modeling

3D Printing at Dunwoody is more than just prototyping of parts.

Engineering Drafting & Design students were recently tasked with creating their own golf putters. Students designed putter heads in SolidWorks and printed prototypes using the College’s Stratasys 3D Printers. But they didn’t stop there. Students then took their models to Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center to make metal castings of their designs before machining and refining them into polished, ready-to-use golf putters.

Dunwoody’s Haas Education Center grows

Dunwoody College of Technology’s Haas Education Center recently added a new Haas VF-2 vertical milling machine to its collection.

This state-of-the-art machine will expose second-year Machine Tool Technology students to multi-axis machining, tool probing, and part probing functions–giving these students experience with the latest tools in their industry. But it’s not just the machining students who will be working with this new equipment.

New equipment promotes hands-on collaboration

“One of the main reasons we got this machine was to support special projects and program collaboration,” said Brian Nelsen, Machine Tool Technology Senior Instructor.

The Haas Center has become an important space for all students to bring their hands-on assignments to life – like the electronic bikes designed and built by the Engineering Drafting & Design students. And with the growing number of students enrolled in programs like Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Engineering Technology where hands-on projects are key, the addition of this machine will help support a higher volume of work.

Watch the machine in action:

Developing a Leadership Mindset: Five Points

Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration, describes his personal leadership as a “work in process,” not a “work in progress.”

Photo of Ted Ferrara speaking at Dunwoody.

Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration, was the April 2016 Leadership Lecture speaker at Dunwoody.

“Some days progress, some days regress, but all days are part of a process,” Ferrara said. One of the owners of Standard Heating & Air Conditioning, a local, family-owned business, Ferrara shared his thoughts on leadership during the April 7 C. Charles Jackson Leadership Lecture Series at Dunwoody College of Technology.

The Dunwoody alum and immediate Past Chairperson of the Board of Trustees, Ferrara also holds a B.A. and B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Metropolitan State University and an MBA from Harvard University.

During his talk, Ferrara defined “Leadership that Matters,” as “Helping people get to a place they would not have otherwise been inclined to go,” and touched on five main points.

  1. Be a Good Follower.  Know what it is to be a good follower.  It is an active pursuit, not a passive one. Ask yourself, “Would I want me as a follower?” Good followers push back when they disagree and help ensure that their leaders are successful. Becoming a good follower helps future leaders develop understanding and empathy.
  2. Take Ownership. The organization you work for is an extension of yourself and taking ownership means going beyond the job description and taking responsibility to ensure that nothing falls through the cracks. At the same time, don’t take on everyone’s problems. Instead, empower others to become problem solvers.
  3. No Excuses. Leadership is difficult and risky personally, and things don’t always work out, but nobody buys excuses. Instead, ask yourself if you had a “do-over” knowing what you know now, would you have done anything different. By adopting a “no excuses” mentality you put your best efforts forward and unleash a lot of creative problem solving.
  4. Define Reality. Whether it’s an established and well-functioning enterprise or a total turn-around, a leader’s job is to first figure out where the organization is at and then help others understand that reality.
  5. Lead With Values. Define and communicate your core values. In an uncertain world, this is where you find certainty.  Shared values are the strongest reasons for people to follow you.

Watch the video

Hands-on with robotic arms

Student project entitled Bad Escape Artist, spells out "LET ME OUT" with a dry erase marker. Second-year Automated Systems & Robotics students were recently tasked with a simple assignment: to design an industrial robot program for any application of their choosing.

According to Instructor Joey White, the only requirement was that “they needed to demonstrate the use of position registers, the offset motion option along with math instructions to make sequential moves in a specific pattern based on a minimum number of taught reference points.”

A hands-on project gives real-world experience

In addition to programming the robot, the students also used SolidWorks to design the tooling at the end of the robotic arm and later brought their tools to life using the College’s Stratasys 3D printers.

This approach to the project exposed students to the full process of putting together a packaging system from start to finish — finding solutions to problems from the very first stage of production.

“I’ve learned a lot more about the automated packaging systems and how they can be utilized in so many ways,” said second-year Automated Systems & Robotics student Dallas Stewart. “It’s crazy the amount of opportunity there is in this field.”

One robot, many applications

With the guidelines in mind, the students paired up and got to work in Dunwoody’s FANUC-certified robotics lab — designing an array of robotic programs.

  • Spiral Supreme, designed by Mark Reznikov and Jesse Theis: this program is designed to pick up and drop metal balls down a spiral chute.
  • Bad Escape Artist, designed by Dallas Stewart and Steve Thulien: this program was designed to write “LET ME OUT” with a dry-erase marker and then erase it.
  • Robot Piano, designed by James Olson and Will Snyder: designed to play “Hot Cross Buns” on the piano.
  • Auto Butler, designed by Kim Wieting and Mike Prudhon: designed to serve glass bottles.

“What I really enjoy most about this class is actually being able to program the PLC’s and the robots rather than just talking about it in theory,” Stewart said.

Visit Dunwoody’s Automated Systems & Robotics program web page for more information or contact Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle at edaigle@dunwoody.edu.

Dunwoody & Mortenson Construction Win “Best Meal Award” at 2015 CANstruction

Team Donates 6,000 + Canned Goods to Second Harvest Heartland

IMG_2033-smallDunwoody’s Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department teamed up with Mortenson Construction for the 2015 Minneapolis CANstruction fundraiser—an annual event where participating teams build colossal structres made entirely out of cans of food.

The CANstruction team earned the “Best Meal” Award at the event, which was held at the Mall of America last month. The award is given annually to the team that uses the most nourishing, protein-packed food items.

Proceeds from the Minneapolis event were given to Second Harvest Heartland, the Upper Midwest’s largest hunger-relief organization.

There are over 150 CANstruction events held throughout the world each year.

Minnesota History Inspires 2015 CANstruction Sculpture Theme

IMG_8751-smallThe 2015 sculpture—designed and built by Interior Design and Construction Management students–was themed “Feast Like a Viking.” Cans of beans, tomatoes, vegetables and coconut milk made up the ship—complete with oars, a mast, sail and dragon head—while cans of tuna were used to represent ocean waves.

The CANstruction team chose the Viking theme because it represents the rich history of Minnesota. The voyage of Leif Erikson—who is often considered to be the first European to discover America—was recreated in 1927, with a final landed in Duluth, Minnesota. Journal entries from that expedition were kept and often detailed the crew’s difficulty in finding fresh fish and ripe vegetables.

This inspired the CANstruction team’s motto, which is “no-one’s ‘voyage through life’ should be limited by hunger”…especially today.

CANstruction Provides Students with Beneficial, Real World Experience

The entire project lasted about five weeks. During that time, Mortenson Construction and Dunwoody students not only designed the sculpture but also collected more than 6,000 cans of food.

Interior Design Principal Instructor and CANstruction Coordinator Cindy Martimo said that although the students were working with canned goods, the project did require students to use skills and best practices they would also perform on a real job.

“It required two very different departments to work together—especially on build day,” said Martimo. “Only five people could build at a time. So those who weren’t building had to provide various levels of support to the builders by unpacking boxes, passing cans, etc. The team had to practice time management, communicate with one another, follow a set of plans, and ultimately create the structure they designed.”

Click below to view a timelapse video of the CANstruction team assembling the sculpture at the event.

This is the fourth year the Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department has participated in a CANstruction event, and, according to Martimo, the students support and dollars raised grow each time.

“The event has really become a great opportunity for our students,” she said. “They get to be creative, design something and raise money for charity. In addition, their creations are judged by the very people who might someday offer them a job. The other teams out on the floor are all architecture and engineering firms. These are people that the students will be working with –or be hired by–one day. To have that kind of industry presence and to be able to add the CANstruction event to their resumes is very beneficial.”

Get Involved in CANstruction 2016

The Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department plans to continue the event next year. The project is open to all students in the Department. 

To get involved in CANstruction 2016, contact Cindy Martimo at cmartimo@dunwoody.edu.

 

A big thank you to this year’s sponsors: Mortenson Construction, Parsons Electric, Custom Drywall, and Ames Construction

Sewing Program Featured on PBS Documentary Series Dropping Back In

Dunwoody College’s partnership with the Makers Coalition will again be featured on the PBS documentary series Dropping Back In.

ThSewing students at work.e five-episode series illustrates the enormous personal and societal costs to students who drop out of high school, and how successful training-based programs—such as those offered by Dunwoody—can help counter those losses.

Dunwoody’s Dean of Workforce Training & Continuing Education Debra Hanson (Kerrigan) as well as two sewing program graduates are featured in the fifth episode of the series “Building A Better Future.”

Two sewing students examining project.

“Building A Better Future” will air Sunday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. on Twin Cities Public Television (tpt), with repeats on October 3 and 4. Pioneer Public Television (KWCM) will run the show on September 27 and 29.

If you can’t catch the documentary those evenings, the full show can also be found here:

Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing Student Surprised with Tool Grant

Earlier this spring, ABRA Auto Body partnered with the Collision Repair Education Foundation (CREF) and awarded 10 collision repair students with tool grants.

With the help of Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing Principal Instructor Bruce Graffunder, Dunwoody student Anthony Pung learned he was one of those students during a class lecture:

The grant—open to high school seniors and/or post-secondary students studying collision repair—provided the winning students with the opportunity to select $2,000 worth of Snap-On tools and equipment from a list of entry-level body tools.

Anthony smiling after receiving tools from ABRA representatives

A few weeks after learning he was a grant winner, Anthony was able to meet representatives from ABRA and select his desired tools.

 

“The grant will make a huge difference in my life by providing me with the tools that I need to be successful in my career path,” said Anthony.

Anthony is currently an intern at Albertville Body Shop where he is learning and performing a wide variety of collision repair practices. Upon completion of his internship in August, Anthony will graduate from with an associate’s degree in Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing.

Anthony plans to use the awarded tools as a starter set for his future employment as a body technician.

Students and Snow Devil 1012 compete in Autonomous Snowplow Competition this weekend

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

The competition runs Jan. 24-25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Rice Park, Downtown St. Paul, Minn.

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

According to the ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition website: “The purpose of this competition is to challenge university and college students, as well as the general public, to design, build, and operate a fully autonomous snowplow to remove snow from a designated path. The objectives of this competition include encouraging students and individuals to utilize the state of the art in navigation and control technologies to rapidly, accurately, and safely clear a path of snow.”

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

Come out and see the latest autonomous navigation technologies from eight of the top engineering universities in the nation.

This is the fifth year Dunwoody has participated in the competition. Here is a preview of the team’s 2015 entry: 

For more information about the competition, visit www.autosnowplow.com.