Category Archives: Photos

Brenda Piliego-Geniz receives $15,000 scholarship from Minneapolis Rotary Club

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, of Arden Hills, recently received a $15,000 scholarship from The Minneapolis Rotary Club to assist her studies at Dunwoody. Piliego-Geniz is a participant in the College’s Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP). YCAP enhances the career opportunities of under-represented youth, by empowering them to graduate from high school and obtain a degree from Dunwoody.

For the past 20 years the Minneapolis Rotary Club has granted a scholarship to a student in the YCAP program. Piliego-Geniz was selected as the scholarship recipient because of her GPA and involvement in the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program. She received the scholarship check at the rotary breakfast on Oct. 29–which she was accompanied to by Dunwoody President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright, Senior Development Officer Mary Meador and YCAP Manager Peggy Quam.

“I want to say thank you for the scholarship. It really means a lot to me because I am the youngest of four and the first to go to college, and I have nobody to ask what the experience was for them and how they got through it,” Piliego-Geniz said.

She added that the scholarship allows to her focus on her schoolwork instead of worrying about how she is going to pay for her education.

For more information about Dunwoody’s YCAP program, visit www.dunwoody.edu/ycap.

Construction Sciences & Building Technology fish house to be raffled Dec. 6

 On Oct. 17 and 18 Construction Sciences & Building Technology students built a Minnesota Bound-themed fish house for Fish House Frenzy Twin Cities.

Minnesota Bound-themed fish house

Teams from Adolfson & Peterson Construction and Kraus-Anderson Construction also participated in the 24-hour construction competition to raise funds for Rebuilding Together Twin Cities, which makes critical repairs for homeowners in need–particularly older adults, individuals living with disabilities, families with small children and members of the armed forces.

While the other fish houses were auctioned off already, the Dunwoody team’s fish house is still available via raffle to be drawn on Saturday, Dec. 6, at 3 p.m. in the parking lot of Joe’s Sporting Goods, 33 East County Road B, St. Paul.

In addition to raising money for a good cause, the students learned about the importance of preparation and teamwork.

Students learned through trial and error how to manage people and time. During a recap session they shared ideas about technical and management problems that arose,” said Senior Instructor James Strapko. “For example, they agreed on the value of preparation and following the drawings. They also recognized the need for establishing clear lines of authority and matching work crews with tasks.”

Through the competition construction students formed partnerships with other Dunwoody programs. The College’s HVAC and Electrical students provided some labor and materials for this year’s project, and Interior Design students have expressed interest in participating with the College’s Fish House Frenzy team next year.

Raffle
Saturday, Dec. 6, at 3 p.m. in the parking lot of Joe’s Sporting Goods, 33 East County Road B, St. Paul.  Tickets are $20. To purchase raffle tickets, email k.greiner@rebuildingtogether-twincities.org.

MDES students visit Modern Metals Foundry Inc. for putter casting project

Engineering Drafting & Design students in the Product Design class recently visited Modern Metals Foundry Inc. in Bloomington, Minn. The visit is part of a golf putter design project the students are working on.

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Before the students visited the foundry, Dan Taylor, pattern maker and partial owner of Modern Metals, spent a day in the classroom working with 21 students to create golf putter designs and follow boards that could be easily cast in aluminum.

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“At the foundry the students were able to watch the actual process of packing the sand into a core and cavity using one of their putter patterns and follow boards,” said Senior Instructor Andrew LeRoy. “The sand was hardened using a CO2 process. Finally the sprue and runners were cut into the mold and the liquid aluminum was poured into the mold by hand using a ladle. After a cooling period the part was removed and then brought into the grinding area to clean it up.”

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When all the putter parts are complete they will be returned to the students to do the final machining of the putters striking faces and installation of the shaft and grip.

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“This project makes the design process come to life from conception through final manufacturing of a part using required standards from industry. It is very realistic and mirrors what graduates will face in industry on a smaller scale,” LeRoy said. “Modern Metals has been integral to the MDES program for several years and they really make an invaluable contribution.”

Putter Contest
For this project the students are required to ensure their putter meets United States Golf Association standards of weight and design. In mid to late November the students will host a putting contest for Dunwoody faculty, staff and students–who will be asked to vote for which putter they think is best. The winner will be listed on a trophy displayed in the Robotics & Manufacturing department.

Dunwoody students sweep national packaging design competition

 

A team of Dunwoody College of Technology Design & Graphics Technology students won first place in both categories of the Association of Independent Corrugated Converters (AICC) Annual Student Packaging Design Competition “Design to an Opportunity.”

The 2014 competition was a three-part structural and graphic design project and 27 colleges nationwide participated. The Dunwoody team–Stephanie Burdorf, Charlotte LaCour, Jenna Weiler, Dan Mueller, Noah Rabinowitz and Finn Pearson–was challenged to create a real-world marketing solution for the College that included a standing display for use at college fairs or on campus; a mailing envelope to send to potential students; and a welcome kit for new students.

“We were judged on the creativity, marketability, design attributes, manufacturing, durability, and ease of assembly for the structure of all three projects,” said team leader Stephanie Burdorf. “We were also judged separately on the graphics of all three projects on how well they created a brand and tied-in with each other to give them all a similar look.”

Graphically, the team used the College’s branding guidelines and in-house photographs, while also incorporating archived photos from the 1920’s and centennial seal to celebrate the College’s 100-year history.

“Structurally, we designed three separate units that would follow the enrollment process for Dunwoody that would allow optimal student retention. The standee is designed to rotate, allowing for viewer interaction as well as utilizing the entire space for attention grabbing graphics and information,” explained Burdorf. “The mailing envelope is designed to create a visually intriguing piece that serves as an attractive and durable folder. And finally, the welcome kit is designed to be handed out to new students as a place to hold all materials gathered throughout their first day experience. This structure was also designed to fit inside a locker, increasing locker sales as well as making it easier for a student to use throughout the year.”

Burdof said the team learned a lot through the competition.

“Not only have we all become more proficient with the Adobe and Esko programs and software, but we also all had a chance to work in a real world setting,” she said. “We had to work as a team, follow a strict timeline, research on what was in place as well as what was needed, find materials, and work with different departments as well as industry partners.”

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology program has a rich history of winning national competitions, but this is the first non-flexographic win, the first international win, and the largest and deepest in talent in terms of number of schools competing.

“Because of the timing of the competition, we are obliged to compete with first-year students, as no team member can participate after graduation, and the annual AICC deadline is in late June,” said Principal Instructor and Faculty Advisor Pete Rivard. “The four-year universities with their graduate programs typically field teams with juniors, seniors, and even graduate students, each with successive years of competition experience. So this is an absolute David vs. Goliath story, if you amend the details to have David surrounded by dozens of Goliaths.”

The Design & Graphics Technology faculty said they couldn’t be more proud of their students. For the past several years, they have observed North America’s best colleges and universities compete for the AICC recognition, and it was only last year that they felt the College was ready to enter the competition. Last year’s team won second place in both the structural and graphic design categories for their Lifeguard Chair.

Rivard said this year’s team took complete ownership of their project and delivered excellence with little faculty guidance.

The team expressed gratitude for the industry partners who helped bring their standee concept to life: the biggest industry partner Esko, for crucial design software; Liberty Carton-Golden Valley, who supplied the team at no cost with all the freshly manufactured corrugated that they asked for;  Ambassador Press and The Bureau, who provided CAD table time and some large format printing; and Dunwoody admissions and marketing staff members for initial guidance and concept critiques that helped the team design and manufacture marketing and admissions items that had real value.

The team was invited to attend AICC/TAPPI 2014 Corrugated Week, Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2014, at the Long Beach Convention Center in Long Beach, Calif.  They plan to use their $1,000 cash prize for the AICC contest win to go toward travel expenses to ensure all team members can attend the event. In addition to the monetary award, they will also receive an engraved plaque commemorating their win in the competition.

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology department offers two-year degrees in Graphic Design and Pre-Media Technologies.

 

RDO Integrated Controls supplies Topcon equipment to Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology Program

Dunwoody’s Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology students are using state-of-the-art Topcon equipment thanks to RDO Integrated Controls.

Dunwoody’s Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology students are using state-of-the-art Topcon equipment thanks to RDO Integrated Controls.

RDO Integrated Controls provided the program with four Topcon HiPer SR GNSS receivers and Telsa data collectors with Magnet software at a low cost rental for the school year.  The HiPer SR is a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) used to measure and layout precise locations on the ground.

“The previous equipment was older technology–strictly GPS–and was not utilizing all of the satellites that are available,” said Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology Principal Instructor Kelly Ness. “Now the students are using the latest industry standard equipment.”

RDO Integrated Controls provided the Surveying & Civil Engineering program with four Topcon HiPer SR GNSS receivers and Telsa data collectors with Magnet software at a low cost rental for the school year.

The HiPer SR is able to connect to a network of base Virtual Reference Stations (VRS) that the Minnesota Department of Transportation maintains.  The VRS enables students to achieve centimeter level positioning without a local base station.

Ness said industry partnerships and donations are appreciated and ensure that graduates are familiar with the newest industry technology when they enter the surveying and civil engineering workforce.

For more information about the Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology program, go to http://www.dunwoody.edu/construction/surveying-civil-engineering-technology/

Tesla Motors visit sparks interest of automotive students

 

The Tesla car visit was made possible by two Dunwoody alumni who work at the new Tesla Motors dealership in Eden Prairie. Todd Teele, who graduated from the automotive program in 1997, is the service manager and 2012 graduate Noe Cardenas is a Tesla technician.

A 2013 electric Tesla P85 Model S pulling into the Warren Building sparked the interest of Automotive students Wednesday morning.

The luxury car visit was made possible by two Dunwoody alumni who work at the new Tesla Motors dealership in Eden Prairie. Todd Teele, who graduated from the automotive program in 1997, is the service manager and 2012 graduate Noe Cardenas is a Tesla technician.

Teele and Cardenas showed students and faculty the Model S and answered questions about its state-of-the-art technology.

The Model S is 100 percent electric and features a 17-inch touch screen display, which Teele says are just a few of the features that make it unique.

Dunwoody Automotive students enjoyed looking at various aspects of the 2013 electric Tesla P85 Model S brought to campus from Tesla Motors in Eden Prairie on Jan.

“Our students just love new technology, “ said Senior Instructor Lee Frisvold. “It’s not often they get to see and touch a $120,000 vehicle.”

Teele and Cardenas encouraged students to sharpen their electronic skills to keep up with advancements in automotive technology.

“The automotive industry is changing,” Teele said. “You need to be a strong person with electronics because you’re basically going to be a computer technician.”

Cardenas’ advice to current automotive students is:

  1.  Be punctual.
  2.  Go above and beyond.
  3. Learn more than just the fundamentals.
  4. Listen to your instructors.

MDES and Interior Design classes collaborate on furniture project

Dunwoody’s Engineering Drafting & Design (MDES) and Interior Design students worked together to create eight unique pieces of furniture that will be on display in the Hub on campus this week.

The idea for collaborative project came when MDES faculty member Andrew LeRoy and Interior Design faculty member Nada Sarraf-Knowles were discussing how they both wanted to incorporate use of the College’s 3D printer into their curriculums.

“We decided to work together since product design and furniture design have many areas of overlap,” LeRoy said. “Others from the College got involved as well. This year the welding instructors and students were a big help to one of the projects. Tim Flugum has been helpful with suggestions for the students in the new woodshop. Design & Graphics Technology helped with a corrugated chair.”

Students were put into teams of three or four and asked to create an original chair using a minimum of two materials, with at least four points of contact with the ground, be fully functional, and hold 200 pounds. Each team was given a $100 budget, supplied by the College, to spend on materials. They were also required to determine costs for a manufacturing run of 500 chairs.

Students learned a lot about communication and collaboration through the project.

“Since the students come from different programs they have expertise in different areas and need to rely on one another’s skills in their areas of knowledge. It also teaches them about negotiation,” LeRoy said.

Students said the project was fun and challenging.

MDES student Chris Brenner said it was interesting getting input from someone in another profession, “who thinks differently from the way we think in manufacturing.”

MDES student Nicole Rodriguez said the larger scale project was more challenging than just printing out 3D prints.

“We learned about process and prototyping in general.”

Last spring LeRoy and Sarraf-Knowles won an academic innovation award from the College for the collaborative project.

Machine Tool Technology program earns “Best CNC Student Project” at HTEC National Conference

The Machine Tool Technology program brought home the prize for “Best Student CNC Project” at the 2013 Haas Technical Education Centers (HTEC) National Conference held July 15 in Edmonton, Alberta.

The conference was hosted at Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), a leader in supplying trained machinists and operators to support the booming oil industry. “Filling the Manufacturing Pipeline” was the theme of the conference to discuss both the actual oil pipeline and advocating for how to get skilled workers to fill these jobs.

Prior to the conference the Machine Tool Technology program, led by Senior Machine Tool Technology Instructor Brian Nelsen and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle, worked with Dunwoody Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students to design and build coasters using Solidworks design software and Haas CNC machines.

“The goal of the project was to get YCAP students interested in manufacturing from design to build,” said Daigle. “It worked so well we decided to use this project as an entry for the CNC Student Project competition.”

A total of four awards were given at the conference for outstanding CNC projects. Dunwoody brought 100 sample coasters with next year’s conference dates to give out to attendees.

Daigle said conference attendees shared positive comments about the project and were happy to take home a memento.

The prize for winning was a $2,000 Haas CNC simulator that allows students to debug code before entering the lab to make parts.

“With the increased enrollment in the Machine Tool program this will allow even more students access to a CNC control panel outside of their normal lab hours,” Daigle said.

The 2014 HTEC National Conference will be hosted at Dunwoody.

Prior to the conference the Machine Tool Technology program, led by Senior Machine Tool Technology Instructor Brian Nelsen and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle, worked with Dunwoody Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students to design and build coasters using Solidworks design software and Haas CNC machines.

The prize for winning was a $2,000 Haas CNC simulator that allows students to debug code before entering the lab to make parts.