Category Archives: News Releases

Viking Electric, IDEAL Industries donate tools for Electrical Construction & Maintenance

IDEAL Industries Key Account Area Manager Gary Shantz recently spoke to first- and second-semester Electrical Construction & Maintenance students about new electrical hand tools and technology used by industry professionals. Following his presentation Shantz donated more than $1,500 worth of tools to the College on behalf of IDEAL Industries—including screwdrivers, wire strippers, drill attachments, wire nutdrivers and meters for use in classroom labs.IDEAL donation

IDEAL Industries develops products and practical technology demanded by industries including electrical, wire processing and construction. Viking Electric Supply is an electrical industry wholesaler, distributing products from over 400 manufacturers.

The College’s partnership with Viking Electric goes back to 1988.

Senior Instructor Jeff Chase says he appreciates not only the donation, but also the presentation by Shantz because “it provides students with industry tool knowledge that they can use once they graduate and are working in the electrical industry.”

CaringBridge founder Sona Mehring to keynote Dunwoody College Commencement

Photo of Sona Mehring, founder and CEO of CaringBridgeDunwoody College of Technology is delighted to announce that Sona Mehring, CEO and founder of CaringBridge, the leading website for rallying support during a health crisis, will be the keynote speaker at our Commencement on Thursday, May 14, at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Throughout her successful career in computer programming, Sona always searched for a way to help others with her skills. Her expertise was such that she owned and operated her own computer consulting firm that came with it’s own rewards. However, in 1997 when close friends experienced a serious medical crisis, Sona was inspired to create a solution around how to communicate with family and loved ones during a critical time and CaringBridge was born.

Sona was the first to recognize that the Internet could be a powerful tool in helping people connect and rally support during difficult times. Seeing her friends struggle with communication, Sona created a website that allowed them to easily share updates with their support community. What started as an act of kindness for her friends soon became Sona’s passion, and eventually her new career.

CaringBridge logoPeople around the world are now able to share news, receive comfort and coordinate care by creating private, personal websites through CaringBridge. Since its creation, CaringBridge websites have been visited nearly 2 billion times. Sona’s business insight told her the success of CaringBridge could be lucrative, but she cared more about its benefit to others than to herself. Choosing mission over profit potential, Sona made the website a nonprofit in 2002. This ensured that CaringBridge remained free from outside financial pressures and focused on helping anyone, anywhere get the social support they need during their health journey.

Sona serves on the National Caregiver Council, a group of leaders in the industry that studies the issues and technology impacting caregivers and their families. Sona is an active member of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, Women Business Leaders of the U.S. Health Care Industry Foundation, and is on the board of Minne*, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing Minnesota’s technology community. She has also participated as a speaker and panelist at many healthcare and caregiver related events.

Sona is the author of Hope Conquers All: Inspiring Stories of Love and Healing from CaringBridge.

Sona has received numerous honors for her leadership and vision, including:

  • 2015: Star Tribune’s Annual “Ten to Watch” List
  • 2014: The Breast Cancer Education Association Award for Outstanding Support and Outreach to the Breast Cancer Community
  • 2014: 1 of 35 Women Leaders in Minnesota Healthcare by The Women’s Health Leadership TRUST
  • 2013: 41st on Minnesota Monthly’s List of 75 Most Influential People of the Twin Cities
  • 2011: One of Fast Company’s “Most Influential Women in Technology”
  • 2010: The Health Care Heroes Award from Twin Cities Business Magazine
  • 2009: 25 Women Industry Leaders in the Twin Cities by the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal
  • Good Neighbor Award – CBS affiliate WCCO-TV
  • Alumni Excellence Award – University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
  • Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition for outstanding service to the community

Zech Bradach and Ollie Reller place in Behind the Mask welding competition

Zech Bradach earned second place in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and third place in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Reller earned third place in the GMAW division.

L-R: Ollie Reller earned third place in the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) division. Zech Bradach earned second place in GMAW and third place in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).

Twelve Welding Technology students participated in the Behind the Mask Welding Competition sponsored by the American Welding Society (AWS) on Feb. 26. Around 100 students from Minnesota and Wisconsin colleges competed in the event held at Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

Students competed in several categories utilizing such welding processes as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), and Oxy-acetylene Cutting (OFC). During the timed events students were presented with a blueprint and the metal components required to complete a weldment in 20 minutes. The weldments were then inspected by AWS Certified Welding Inspectors who scrutinized the dimensions, weld size and weld quality.

Each division placed the top three individuals to receive prizes. First place won an auto darkening welding helmet (worth $500) and $100 cash, second place winners earned $50 cash, and third place winners took home $25 cash.

Dunwoody student participants were: Zech Bradach, Ben Browne, Jacob Dommer, Lucas Hoglund, Curtis Mattson-Laurent, Max Mertans, Brendan Pliego, Ollie Reller, Austin Reuter, Kristen Schafer and Nikki Umpleby, Wyatt Werner.

Bradach earned second place in GMAW and third place in SMAW. Reller earned third place in the GMAW division.

Dunwoody Instructor Michael Reeser said he’s proud of his students’ performance in the competition.

“This is an excellent opportunity to reinforce the advanced skills that we teach on a daily basis and allows students to apply those skills in a timed event. It motivates students to produce quality work as it is scored by industry-certified welding inspectors,” he said.

To learn more about Dunwoody’s Welding Technology program, visit http://www.dunwoody.edu/manufacturing/welding-technology/

 

 

 

 

Students start Institute of Industrial Engineers chapter

Three industry professionals involved with IIE attended the Dunwoody chapter’s kickoff meeting on Feb. 10. They are pictured with the student members and Faculty Advisor Janet Nurnberg.

Three industry professionals involved with IIE attended the Dunwoody chapter’s kickoff meeting on Feb. 10, they are pictured with the student members and Faculty Advisor Janet Nurnberg.

Students in the Industrial Engineering Technology (IENG) bachelor completion program have started a student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) at Dunwoody College of Technology.

IIE is a professional society dedicated to the support of the industrial engineering profession by providing leadership for the application, education, training, research and development of industrial engineering.

Dunwoody’s IENG program provides a 2+2 bachelor degree completion option with the skills and theoretical knowledge needed to advance graduates into engineering and management positions in their respective industries.

Three industry professionals involved with IIE attended the Dunwoody chapter’s kickoff meeting on Feb. 10 to discuss how involvement in industry organizations can enhance students’ learning experience: Nate Andrican – Industrial Engineer, Boston Scientific, IIE Twin Cities Student Liaison; Dan Thury – Industrial Engineer, Andersen Corporation, IIE Regional Vice-President; and Jeromy Knapp – Quality Engineer, Stratasys, IIE Twin Cities President-Elect, IENG PAC Member.

Faculty Advisor Janet Nurnberg says the College’s IIE student chapter helps prepare IENG students for careers after graduation by providing members with networking opportunities, tours of local facilities that hire IENG students and professional development.

The chapter of around 15 members is student-led: President Micah Thorson, Vice-President Dylan Olson, Treasurer Richard Brodala, and Secretary Matt Backus. The chapter will host meetings at least twice a semester. Because of students’ daytime work hours, meetings will be held in the evenings.

Thorson says the IENG students are excited for the opportunity to start an IIE student chapter on campus, and are looking forward to the seeing real-world examples of theories they’re learning about in the classroom during IIE business tours and events.

For more information about IENG or the IIE student chapter at Dunwoody, contact Nurnberg at 612-381-3351 or jnurnberg@dunwoody.edu.

Snow Devil 1012 team earns third place in Autonomous Snowplow Competition

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The Snow Devil 1012 plow team earned third place and the Golden Smile Sportsmanship Award last weekend at the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition.  The event is part of the St. Paul Winter Carnival and took place in Rice Park.

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The Snow Devil 1012 used a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC electronic signal. Course correction calculations were done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

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The University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Zenith and Yeti plows earned first and second place. Dunwoody’s Snow Devil 1012 earned third place, followed by the University of Calgary’s Fighting Mongooses, North Dakota State University’s Thundar, Case Western Reserve University’s Von Snowmower, University of Minnesota’s Ground Squirrel, and North Dakota State University’s Snowmenator.

Faculty Advisor and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle said the Snow Devil 1012’s simplistic design and marketability set it apart from the competition.

“Most of the robots had over $10,000 in just sensors. Our total robot cost was $3,000 and could be implemented today by embedding magnetic sensors into a sidewalk or driveway,” he said.

For earning third place, the Snow Devil team won $2,000. Part of the prize money was used to build this year’s robot, some was used for a celebration dinner for the team and the rest will be used to kick start next year’s team.

The team also won the Golden Smile Sportsmanship Award and $500.  Daigle said the team did a lot to deserve the sportsmanship award. The Dunwoody Snow Devils: helped every team with tools, wire and parts to make repairs; cheered the loudest for every team as they competed; organized and participated in the parade with two other teams; initiated crowd participation through an audible checklist and 1-800-SNO-PLOW; and helped tear down the competition field after the event.

WCCO Channel 4 News’ Rachel Slavik interviewed Daigle for the story “Autonomous Snowplow Competition Wows Winter Carnival.”

ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition

According to the ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition website: “The purpose of this competition is to challenge university and college students, as well as the general public, to design, build, and operate a fully autonomous snowplow to remove snow from a designated path. The objectives of this competition include encouraging students and individuals to utilize the state of the art in navigation and control technologies to rapidly, accurately, and safely clear a path of snow.”

 

R.T. Rybak speaks at MLK Day Diversity Forum

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

Around 100 students and staff filled the Holden Center on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, Jan. 15, to hear former Minneapolis Mayor and Executive Director of Generation Next R.T. Rybak talk about King’s vision and the importance of equality.

Rybak was the 150th person to speak about diversity and inclusion at one of the College’s monthly Cultural Diversity Forums. The Forums expose students and staff to different cultures and various perspectives.

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

“One of the most important things you can learn at Dunwoody is to sit down in the lunch room and talk to someone who is different from you. Sounds trivial, doesn’t it? But the fact of the matter is that’s not happening everywhere,” he said.

Rybak said the issues of race and opportunity are subtler today than they were in the past–stressing that those who succeed will cross boundaries.

“We each need to find somebody different than us and try to understand who they are. That’s not an obvious thing. That’s not something that will get a day named after you someday, but it is absolutely about the daily work of living a dream.”

February Forum
The College’s February Forum celebrates Black History Month. Civil rights leader Dr. Josie Johnson is the keynote speaker and Grammy Award winning-singer Kimberly Brown will perform. The Forum is Tuesday, Feb. 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Brenda Piliego-Geniz receives $15,000 scholarship from Minneapolis Rotary Club

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, of Arden Hills, recently received a $15,000 scholarship from The Minneapolis Rotary Club to assist her studies at Dunwoody. Piliego-Geniz is a participant in the College’s Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP). YCAP enhances the career opportunities of under-represented youth, by empowering them to graduate from high school and obtain a degree from Dunwoody.

For the past 20 years the Minneapolis Rotary Club has granted a scholarship to a student in the YCAP program. Piliego-Geniz was selected as the scholarship recipient because of her GPA and involvement in the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program. She received the scholarship check at the rotary breakfast on Oct. 29–which she was accompanied to by Dunwoody President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright, Senior Development Officer Mary Meador and YCAP Manager Peggy Quam.

“I want to say thank you for the scholarship. It really means a lot to me because I am the youngest of four and the first to go to college, and I have nobody to ask what the experience was for them and how they got through it,” Piliego-Geniz said.

She added that the scholarship allows to her focus on her schoolwork instead of worrying about how she is going to pay for her education.

For more information about Dunwoody’s YCAP program, visit www.dunwoody.edu/ycap.

MDES students visit Modern Metals Foundry Inc. for putter casting project

Engineering Drafting & Design students in the Product Design class recently visited Modern Metals Foundry Inc. in Bloomington, Minn. The visit is part of a golf putter design project the students are working on.

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Before the students visited the foundry, Dan Taylor, pattern maker and partial owner of Modern Metals, spent a day in the classroom working with 21 students to create golf putter designs and follow boards that could be easily cast in aluminum.

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“At the foundry the students were able to watch the actual process of packing the sand into a core and cavity using one of their putter patterns and follow boards,” said Senior Instructor Andrew LeRoy. “The sand was hardened using a CO2 process. Finally the sprue and runners were cut into the mold and the liquid aluminum was poured into the mold by hand using a ladle. After a cooling period the part was removed and then brought into the grinding area to clean it up.”

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When all the putter parts are complete they will be returned to the students to do the final machining of the putters striking faces and installation of the shaft and grip.

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“This project makes the design process come to life from conception through final manufacturing of a part using required standards from industry. It is very realistic and mirrors what graduates will face in industry on a smaller scale,” LeRoy said. “Modern Metals has been integral to the MDES program for several years and they really make an invaluable contribution.”

Putter Contest
For this project the students are required to ensure their putter meets United States Golf Association standards of weight and design. In mid to late November the students will host a putting contest for Dunwoody faculty, staff and students–who will be asked to vote for which putter they think is best. The winner will be listed on a trophy displayed in the Robotics & Manufacturing department.