Category Archives: Industry Partners

Dunwoody students sweep national packaging design competition

 

A team of Dunwoody College of Technology Design & Graphics Technology students won first place in both categories of the Association of Independent Corrugated Converters (AICC) Annual Student Packaging Design Competition “Design to an Opportunity.”

The 2014 competition was a three-part structural and graphic design project and 27 colleges nationwide participated. The Dunwoody team–Stephanie Burdorf, Charlotte LaCour, Jenna Weiler, Dan Mueller, Noah Rabinowitz and Finn Pearson–was challenged to create a real-world marketing solution for the College that included a standing display for use at college fairs or on campus; a mailing envelope to send to potential students; and a welcome kit for new students.

“We were judged on the creativity, marketability, design attributes, manufacturing, durability, and ease of assembly for the structure of all three projects,” said team leader Stephanie Burdorf. “We were also judged separately on the graphics of all three projects on how well they created a brand and tied-in with each other to give them all a similar look.”

Graphically, the team used the College’s branding guidelines and in-house photographs, while also incorporating archived photos from the 1920’s and centennial seal to celebrate the College’s 100-year history.

“Structurally, we designed three separate units that would follow the enrollment process for Dunwoody that would allow optimal student retention. The standee is designed to rotate, allowing for viewer interaction as well as utilizing the entire space for attention grabbing graphics and information,” explained Burdorf. “The mailing envelope is designed to create a visually intriguing piece that serves as an attractive and durable folder. And finally, the welcome kit is designed to be handed out to new students as a place to hold all materials gathered throughout their first day experience. This structure was also designed to fit inside a locker, increasing locker sales as well as making it easier for a student to use throughout the year.”

Burdof said the team learned a lot through the competition.

“Not only have we all become more proficient with the Adobe and Esko programs and software, but we also all had a chance to work in a real world setting,” she said. “We had to work as a team, follow a strict timeline, research on what was in place as well as what was needed, find materials, and work with different departments as well as industry partners.”

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology program has a rich history of winning national competitions, but this is the first non-flexographic win, the first international win, and the largest and deepest in talent in terms of number of schools competing.

“Because of the timing of the competition, we are obliged to compete with first-year students, as no team member can participate after graduation, and the annual AICC deadline is in late June,” said Principal Instructor and Faculty Advisor Pete Rivard. “The four-year universities with their graduate programs typically field teams with juniors, seniors, and even graduate students, each with successive years of competition experience. So this is an absolute David vs. Goliath story, if you amend the details to have David surrounded by dozens of Goliaths.”

The Design & Graphics Technology faculty said they couldn’t be more proud of their students. For the past several years, they have observed North America’s best colleges and universities compete for the AICC recognition, and it was only last year that they felt the College was ready to enter the competition. Last year’s team won second place in both the structural and graphic design categories for their Lifeguard Chair.

Rivard said this year’s team took complete ownership of their project and delivered excellence with little faculty guidance.

The team expressed gratitude for the industry partners who helped bring their standee concept to life: the biggest industry partner Esko, for crucial design software; Liberty Carton-Golden Valley, who supplied the team at no cost with all the freshly manufactured corrugated that they asked for;  Ambassador Press and The Bureau, who provided CAD table time and some large format printing; and Dunwoody admissions and marketing staff members for initial guidance and concept critiques that helped the team design and manufacture marketing and admissions items that had real value.

The team was invited to attend AICC/TAPPI 2014 Corrugated Week, Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2014, at the Long Beach Convention Center in Long Beach, Calif.  They plan to use their $1,000 cash prize for the AICC contest win to go toward travel expenses to ensure all team members can attend the event. In addition to the monetary award, they will also receive an engraved plaque commemorating their win in the competition.

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology department offers two-year degrees in Graphic Design and Pre-Media Technologies.

 

Machine Tool Technology program earns “Best CNC Student Project” at HTEC National Conference

The Machine Tool Technology program brought home the prize for “Best Student CNC Project” at the 2013 Haas Technical Education Centers (HTEC) National Conference held July 15 in Edmonton, Alberta.

The conference was hosted at Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), a leader in supplying trained machinists and operators to support the booming oil industry. “Filling the Manufacturing Pipeline” was the theme of the conference to discuss both the actual oil pipeline and advocating for how to get skilled workers to fill these jobs.

Prior to the conference the Machine Tool Technology program, led by Senior Machine Tool Technology Instructor Brian Nelsen and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle, worked with Dunwoody Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students to design and build coasters using Solidworks design software and Haas CNC machines.

“The goal of the project was to get YCAP students interested in manufacturing from design to build,” said Daigle. “It worked so well we decided to use this project as an entry for the CNC Student Project competition.”

A total of four awards were given at the conference for outstanding CNC projects. Dunwoody brought 100 sample coasters with next year’s conference dates to give out to attendees.

Daigle said conference attendees shared positive comments about the project and were happy to take home a memento.

The prize for winning was a $2,000 Haas CNC simulator that allows students to debug code before entering the lab to make parts.

“With the increased enrollment in the Machine Tool program this will allow even more students access to a CNC control panel outside of their normal lab hours,” Daigle said.

The 2014 HTEC National Conference will be hosted at Dunwoody.

Prior to the conference the Machine Tool Technology program, led by Senior Machine Tool Technology Instructor Brian Nelsen and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle, worked with Dunwoody Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) students to design and build coasters using Solidworks design software and Haas CNC machines.

The prize for winning was a $2,000 Haas CNC simulator that allows students to debug code before entering the lab to make parts.

Mortenson Construction funds solar panel addition to Dunwoody rooftop

Solar panels on Dunwoody rooftop

The 255 watt, 37.8 V DC panels were recently installed by Electrical Construction & Maintenance Technology Instructor Steve Lee and Electrical Program Manager Chad Kurdi.

Thanks to a generous donation from Mortenson Construction, the roof of Dunwoody College of Technology now houses 10 solar panels.

The 255 watt, 37.8 V DC panels were recently installed by Electrical Construction & Maintenance Technology Instructor Steve Lee and Electrical Program Manager Chad Kurdi.

The solar panels will generate 2.5 kilowatt at 338 V DC, which Kurdi says is enough to power a 2000-square-foot house without large consuming electrical equipment (range, air conditioning, dryer and water heater).

Kurdi says it’s important to incorporate green energy technology into the College’s Electrical program.

“The country and state are moving more towards green energy power,” he said. “The Solar PV system is the first step in acquiring more renewable energy sources like wind to train our electrical students on this technology.”

In addition to training Dunwoody’s electrical students and offsetting some of the electrical lab’s power consumption, Kurdi says the addition of the solar panels showcases the College’s commitment to renewable energy and earth stewardship.

 

 

Kurdi posted a video of the solar panel installation on his YouTube channel.  

Dunnwoody’s TTEN students celebrate their success

TTEN group at track

Dunwoody students, alumni and staff members spent the afternoon of June 14 racing go-carts.

In February the Dunwoody College of Technology TTEN (Toyota Technical Education Network) program was recognized as No. 2 among 54 TTEN schools nationwide.

Such an accomplishment is worth celebrating, and Toyota made it easy by providing funds for 32 Dunwoody students, alumni and staff members to spend the afternoon of June 14 racing go-carts at Stockholm Motorsports Park in Cokato as well as lunching on catered food from Famous Dave’s for lunch.

In addition to the fun day, the Auto program was awarded a scan tool, which students use to analyze the interface of vehicles, said Auto instructor Lee Frisvold.

Frisvold said go-cart racing was the perfect way for the students and staff to celebrate.

“There was a lot of good, close racing,” Frisvold said.

Race winners

Kyle Meyers, 2012 Honda PACT graduate, out-raced 31 of his former classmates and instructors to earn the first place honor.

Kyle Meyers, 2012 Honda PACT (Professional Automotive Career Training) graduate, out-raced his former classmates and instructors to earn the first place honor.

Frisvold said he hopes the day at Stockholm is one his students never forget.

“It was a really fun day. Those are the times people remember,” he said.

This isn’t the first year the Dunwoody program ranked high among the TTEN schools. In 2006 the program earned the School of the Year title and in 2010 the program earned the second place title and a scan tool.

If the TTEN students continue to excel as they have in the past, Frisvold says there is no reason Dunwoody won’t continue to rank as one of the top TTEN schools in the nation.

“Hopefully we will be the School of the Year again someday,” Frisvold said. “It’s always our (instructor’s) goal to do the best we can and make the students the best they can possibly be.”

The Dunwoody Toyota TTEN program prepares graduates to be technicians servicing Toyota/Lexus/Scion vehicles at authorized dealerships. Students train specifically on current model Toyota/Lexus vehicles, information systems, scan tools and training materials. Students also complete an internship under the guidance of a master technician at a sponsoring Toyota/Lexus dealership.

All TTEN instructors are certified as Master Technicians by the ASE (National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence). The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF), the branch of ASE which certifies and accredits automotive education programs has certified Dunwoody in all areas of service and repair. Dunwoody has received recognition from Toyota for being one of the best TTEN automotive schools in the nation and is a CEED School, the highest level for a TTEN school.

For more information about the TTEN program, go to www.T-TEN.com or email Frisvold at lfrisvold@dunwoody.edu

Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. receives award from ATEA

The American Technical Educators Association (ATEA) honored Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. with is Silver Award for Excellence at its March 21, 2012, annual conference. The award recognizes Toyota’s commitment to technical education through its’ Technician Training Education Network (T-TEN). Dunwoody College, which is a T-TEN site, nominated Toyota for the award.

T-TEN supports participating schools with internships, employment, training for T-TEN staff, equipment, and vehicle contributions, financial assistance, information sources and up-to-date curriculum. Dunwoody is one of 46 schools across the nation with T-TEN programs and one of seven to be chosen to produce curriculum. Dunwoody has also received full certification as a CEED (Chassis, Electrical, Engine and Drivetrain) school which provides factory level certification credentials to all of its T-TEN students upon graduation.

A photo of Toyota's T-TEN development team with the ATEA Silver Star of Excellence Award

The Technical Development Division, T-TEN Program, Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Torrance, Calif. From left to right: Glory Nakamoto, Scott Sandford, Kevin Booth, Rick Lester Tech Development Manager, George Colletti, Russ Casella, Mona Masai. (Not pictured are: Kieko Shimizu, Andrew Passage and Patty Koerner).