Category Archives: Events

Automotive body paint booth upgrade complete

Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing recently celebrated the completion of major upgrades to the program’s paint booth. The booth upgrade means students and faculty can use waterborne paint, an environmentally friendly paint that is gaining traction in body shops across the U.S. and internationally.

The booth upgrade was made possible by a matching grant from the Minneapolis Green Business Matching Grant Program and sponsors PPG Industries, ABRA Autobody and Glass, Luther Collision and Glass, and Master Collision Group.

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Dunwoody faculty, first and second year Auto students, and industry friends celebrating the upgrade

Waterborne paint, which uses much less solvent than previous paint, provides multiple environmental and economic benefits including lower anthropogenic VOC emissions and reduced job and material costs.

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Lynn Engmark of PPG Industries discusses waterborne paint.

The program celebrated the installation by hosting a “Waterborne 101” presentation, including a brief history of collision instruction at Dunwoody by Bruce Graffunder; a presentation on waterborne paint by Lynn Engmark of PPG Industries;  and some observations on using waterborne paint from Pete Latuff of Latuff Brothers Auto Body.

With so many advantages for both the shop and the customer, “there’s absolutely no reason to not shoot waterborne [paint],” Latuff said when describing his shop’s successful shift away from solvent based paints towards water based paints.

Graffunder explained that this new piece of equipment will also change the Automotive program’s curriculum. As auto body shops across the country transition towards waterborne-based paint practices, Dunwoody Automotive students can expect the same. Graffunder now expects close to 75% of painting time will be devoted to using and learning waterborne based painting techniques. This change in curriculum will better train and prepare Dunwoody students as they progress towards a career in automotive collision repair.

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Lynn Engmark showing how to properly apply waterborne based paint to a car panel.

The afternoon presentation concluded with refreshments and a demonstration from Lynn Engmark on how to properly apply waterborne-based paint to a car panel.

 

Heating & Air Conditioning Engineering Technology students attend ASHRAE Conference, AHR Expo

Heating & Air Conditioning Engineering Technology students Kevin Clausen, Jared Courtney and Bill Bobick attended the 2015 ASHRAE Winter Conference Student Program and AHR Expo in Chicago, Ill., Jan 24-26.

Heating & Air Conditioning Engineering Technology students Kevin Clausen, Jared Courtney and Bill Bobick attended the 2015 ASHRAE Winter Conference Student Program and AHR Expo in Chicago, Ill., Jan 24-26.

Three Heating & Air Conditioning Engineering Technology students attended the 2015 ASHRAE Winter Conference Student Program and AHR Expo in Chicago, Ill., Jan 24-26.

For the last four years, Dunwoody College of Technology—with financial assistance from the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Heating Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)—has sent students to the ASHRAE Winter Meeting in various U.S. cities. This year, students Kevin Clausen, Jared Courtney and Bill Bobick attended the meeting in Chicago with HVAC Program Manager Chuck Taft.

Dunwoody’s Student Chapter of ASHRAE was started in 1988—Taft, then a student, was the first president of the College’s chapter. According to its website, ASHRAE is known for its research, standards writing, publishing and continuing education to shape tomorrow’s built environment. Bobick, who received a HVACR Systems Servicing degree at Dunwoody and worked in industry before entering the Heating & Air Conditioning Engineering Technology program, says ASHRAE’s standards and publications are “the gospel of HVAC” so you know you’re learning from the best when you attend an ASHRAE seminar.

Stephanie Mages, ASHRAE Student Program Staff, is pictured with HVAC Program  Chuck Taft and students Kevin Clausen, Bill Bobick and Jared Courtney.

Stephanie Mages, ASHRAE Student Program Staff, is pictured with HVAC Program Manager Chuck Taft and students Jared Courtney, Bill Bobick and Kevin Clausen.

Taft says the ASHRAE and International Air-Conditioning, Heating, Refrigerating (AHR) events expand students’ understanding of what they’re learning in the classroom, while exposing them to innovative technologies they’ll be using as the industry continuously innovates to become more energy efficient.

During the ASHRAE Student Program, the students listened to project presentations and a panel of young engineers discuss their experiences in the HVACR industry, toured the mechanical spaces of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital and participated in technical talks about the HVACR industry.

The students toured the mechanical spaces of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital.

The students toured the mechanical spaces of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital.

Clausen, Courtney and Bobick said the ASHRAE and AHR events were not only educational, but also great for networking with industry professionals and potential employers. They agreed the greatest educational takeaway at the ASHRAE Student Program was a greater understanding of the thermal storage processes—making cold water at night when the electric rates are low to cool buildings during the day.

More than 2,000 vendors were present at the AHR Expo.

More than 2,000 vendors were present at the AHR Expo.

Taft said he’s glad the students have the opportunity to attend the events to see the reality of where the HVACR industry is, where it’s going and what they should do to become sought-out professionals following graduation.

“Knowledge is power, and the knowledge they gain from experiencing nationally-recognized industry events will make them more valuable employees,” he said.

About ASHRAE
According to ashrae.org: ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability within the industry. Through research, standards writing, publishing and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. ASHRAE was formed as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers by the merger in 1959 of American Society of Heating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHAE) founded in 1894 and The American Society of Refrigerating Engineers (ASRE) founded in 1904.

Newly-launched Jackson Lecture Series has leadership focus

Photo of some of the key organizers of the Jackson Lecture Series. From left to right: Cutlines: 5281: Michael White, Dean of Applied Management; Richard Thomson, Assistant Provost; Board of Trustees Past Chair Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration; Dr. Bruce Jackson, CEO of The Institute of Applied Human Excellence; and President Rich Wagner

L-R: Michael White, Dean of Applied Management; Richard Thomson, Assistant Provost; Board of Trustees Past Chair Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration; Dr. Bruce Jackson, CEO of The Institute of Applied Human Excellence; and President Rich Wagner

More than 50 alumni, students, faculty and friends attended the first ever C. Charles Jackson Leadership Lecture Series on Thursday, Feb. 5 at Dunwoody College of Technology. The event featured Dr. Bruce Jackson, a talented speaker and expert in Leadership and Human Performance. Dr. Jackson kicked off the lecture series by providing a framework for leadership at any level of the organization.

Dr. Jackson serves as the CEO of The Institute of Applied Human Excellence, a training firm dedicated to helping individuals, teams and organizations achieve peak performance. He is also the Executive Director of the C. Charles Jackson Foundation.

The Jackson Leadership Lecture Series features prominent speakers on leadership topics and is being offered the first Thursday of every month. The next event will take place at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 5, at Dunwoody College of Technology, 818 Dunwoody Boulevard, Minneapolis.

Students and Snow Devil 1012 compete in Autonomous Snowplow Competition this weekend

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

Seven students and their Snow Devil 1012 plow will compete in the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition in Rice Park this weekend.

The competition runs Jan. 24-25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Rice Park, Downtown St. Paul, Minn.

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

According to the ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition website: “The purpose of this competition is to challenge university and college students, as well as the general public, to design, build, and operate a fully autonomous snowplow to remove snow from a designated path. The objectives of this competition include encouraging students and individuals to utilize the state of the art in navigation and control technologies to rapidly, accurately, and safely clear a path of snow.”

The Snow Devil 1012 uses a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC signal. Course correction calculations are done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.

Come out and see the latest autonomous navigation technologies from eight of the top engineering universities in the nation.

This is the fifth year Dunwoody has participated in the competition. Here is a preview of the team’s 2015 entry: 

For more information about the competition, visit www.autosnowplow.com.

Student Mindy Heinkel attends Kiewit Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar

Construction Management student Mindy Heinkel was one of 50 female students nationwide selected to attend the Kiewit Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar in Omaha, Neb.

Construction Management student Mindy Heinkel was one of 50 female students nationwide selected to attend the Kiewit Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar in Omaha, Neb.

Construction Management student Mindy Heinkel was one of 50 female students nationwide selected to attend the Kiewit Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar in Omaha, Neb.

The two-day event challenges female students and develops their leadership skills while they gain valuable experience and industry knowledge.

Heinkel applied for the seminar because she wanted to gain greater knowledge about opportunities for women in the construction industry from one of the leading contractors in the world.

“Kiewit is involved in variety of projects from sports arena, bridges, mining, transportation, oil, etcetera,” she said. “I was also intrigued by their diversity in staffing compared to typical construction companies or contractors.”

Heinkel is the first Dunwoody student to attend the national seminar.

“Being involved with the Leadership Seminar provides an opportunity to expose our female students to the opportunities for growth and the unique challenges women in our industry face,” Construction Management Program Manager Heather Gay said. “The Leadership Seminar is a place to build networks across geographic and sector boundaries and creates a shared experience that makes participants able to apply what they learned immediately in their careers and in the classroom.”

Heinkel encourages other female students to apply for future seminars.  She said she left the event with a larger network of current and future industry leaders and greater confidence in her own abilities.

Heinkel encourages other female students to apply for future seminars. She said she left the event with a larger network of current and future industry leaders and greater confidence in her own abilities.

Heinkel said she appreciated the opportunity to attend the leadership event: “The seminar was great. I met a lot of women of all ages from all walks of life. It was very inspiring. The simulation and leadership building activities were phenomenal. The speakers offered a lot of insight to the construction industry and empowerment geared towards women. I learned and was reminded of my worth as a woman and how to turn challenges into opportunity. It was a very motivating experience.”

Heinkel encourages other female students to apply for future seminars.  She said she left the event with a larger network of current and future industry leaders and greater confidence in her own abilities.

“Dunwoody is grateful for the support of Kiewit and its family of companies that provide this opportunity to our students,” said Gay. “Kiewit also has hosted Polly Friendshuh, one of our instructors, in their faculty leadership seminars.  We believe Kiewit’s investment in students and faculty around the world make them an attractive partner in industry.”

 

R.T. Rybak speaks at MLK Day Diversity Forum

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

Around 100 students and staff filled the Holden Center on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, Jan. 15, to hear former Minneapolis Mayor and Executive Director of Generation Next R.T. Rybak talk about King’s vision and the importance of equality.

Rybak was the 150th person to speak about diversity and inclusion at one of the College’s monthly Cultural Diversity Forums. The Forums expose students and staff to different cultures and various perspectives.

Rybak’s speech focused on the importance of fixing the achievement gap in schools and he encouraged attendees to take action to engage with and understand someone who is different than them.

“One of the most important things you can learn at Dunwoody is to sit down in the lunch room and talk to someone who is different from you. Sounds trivial, doesn’t it? But the fact of the matter is that’s not happening everywhere,” he said.

Rybak said the issues of race and opportunity are subtler today than they were in the past–stressing that those who succeed will cross boundaries.

“We each need to find somebody different than us and try to understand who they are. That’s not an obvious thing. That’s not something that will get a day named after you someday, but it is absolutely about the daily work of living a dream.”

February Forum
The College’s February Forum celebrates Black History Month. Civil rights leader Dr. Josie Johnson is the keynote speaker and Grammy Award winning-singer Kimberly Brown will perform. The Forum is Tuesday, Feb. 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

College celebrates 100th Founders Day

President Rich Wagner delivered the following address to the  college community at a Founders Day All-College Assembly on Friday, Dec. 12. The College’s 100th Founders Day occurred on Sunday, Dec. 14.

Rich-Founders-Speech

To start, I want to read a short piece from the Last Will and Testament of William Hood Dunwoody.

“Believing that in the multiplied facilities for obtaining a liberal education by the youth of this state, enough attention has not been given to instruction in the industrial and mechanical arts, therefore, it is my purpose and desire to establish and endow a school to be called the ‘William Hood Dunwoody Industrial Institute’ wherein shall be taught industrial and mechanical arts, giving special importance to the different handicraft and useful trades.”

After William’s death, his wife Kate worked with community leaders to organize and create the structures for this new school that made their dream a reality. On December 14, 1914, Kate attended the opening ceremonies as 80 students and 7 instructors started classes in four programs…and here we are 100 years later.

It is hard to believe: one hundred years of changing lives, providing hope, and building better communities through technical education. William and Kate Dunwoody saw a need and through their visionary leadership and philanthropy wanted, in their words — “to provide for all time a place.” And what a place it has become!

To reflect on all the accomplishments of Dunwoody’s faculty and staff and of Dunwoody’s alumni and students over our first 100 years is overwhelming.

The faculty and staff of Dunwoody:

  • Created and implemented the educational model that is the gold standard for career and technical education and has resulted in Dunwoody being called the birthplace of technical education
  • Provide a unique educational experience that helps students realize their maximum potential
  • Started technical education programs across the globe
  • And today are leading the technical education renaissance

Dunwoody alumni have:

  • Changed companies through the leadership and technical expertise they bring into the world of work
  • Changed industries by creating companies and creating new technologies and processes that revolutionized things like fiberglass welding, microchip processing, and sugar free fat-free commercial baking
  • With the good jobs and great careers a Dunwoody education affords they have changed the world by building better communities as active and productive citizens — in the words of our founders they have “fit themselves for the better performance of life’s duties.”

It is incredible to think that the vision of two humble people has had such a profound impact —an impact that can be seen throughout the Twin Cities, the State of Minnesota and across the globe.

So today we reflect on the significance of Dunwoody and we attempt to understand our place in this great history:

Faculty and staff — not only are you part of the legacy, but you preserve our traditions while helping us reach for the future. Your commitment to the mission of the College keeps us focused and your dedication to our students creates a unique learning environment and distinguishes Dunwoody as the leader in hands-on student centric learning.

Students you are the next chapter in Dunwoody’s storied history. And from what you’ve shown us so far in the results of the competitions in which you participate in many of our programs; the quality of your work displayed across the campus; and what is happening every day in the classroom we can rest assured that the next chapter is going to be even better!

In this this room we see the Dunwoody’s dream, we feel the presence of the Dunwoody’s spirit, and we take great satisfaction in knowing that William and Kate Dunwoody are proud of all the people that have been positively touched by their vision.

It is so cool to look around this room and see all of us gathered together: the people that are Dunwoody. Dunwoody’s legacy isn’t about a building. It’s about a place. And that place is defined, and continues to be defined, by people — all of us and all of those who have gone before. Together we have created for all time a place!

Stay commitment, be proud because together — we are Dunwoody!

Brenda Piliego-Geniz receives $15,000 scholarship from Minneapolis Rotary Club

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Pictured (l-r): YCAP Manager Peggy Quam, Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, and President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright. Piliego-Geniz is holding a skin diagram she created in her studio class using SketchUp. The diagram shows what a house looks like when it is pulled apart and the materials are exposed.

Architecture student Brenda Piliego-Geniz, of Arden Hills, recently received a $15,000 scholarship from The Minneapolis Rotary Club to assist her studies at Dunwoody. Piliego-Geniz is a participant in the College’s Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP). YCAP enhances the career opportunities of under-represented youth, by empowering them to graduate from high school and obtain a degree from Dunwoody.

For the past 20 years the Minneapolis Rotary Club has granted a scholarship to a student in the YCAP program. Piliego-Geniz was selected as the scholarship recipient because of her GPA and involvement in the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program. She received the scholarship check at the rotary breakfast on Oct. 29–which she was accompanied to by Dunwoody President Emeritus Dr. C. Ben Wright, Senior Development Officer Mary Meador and YCAP Manager Peggy Quam.

“I want to say thank you for the scholarship. It really means a lot to me because I am the youngest of four and the first to go to college, and I have nobody to ask what the experience was for them and how they got through it,” Piliego-Geniz said.

She added that the scholarship allows to her focus on her schoolwork instead of worrying about how she is going to pay for her education.

For more information about Dunwoody’s YCAP program, visit www.dunwoody.edu/ycap.