Category Archives: Dunwoody in the News

Auto Instructor Lonny Lunn Receives Instructor Recognition Award

Congratulations to Senior Automotive Instructor Lonny Lunn, a 2015 recipient of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Industry Education Alliance Instructor Recognition Award!

Lonny holding award.

The ASEIEA award is used to recognize instructors who have gone above and beyond in helping their students and advancing their career in technical education.

To achieve this recognition, instructors must meet a number of criteria, including at least five years of teaching experience; documented attendance at instructor training events; a history of placing students in work-based learning assignments; and ASE Master Certification in the area in which they teach.

Lonny talking with student next to car.

“Receiving this award is a great honor,” said Lunn. “Being with the students is the best part of my job. I enjoy nothing more than that learning moment—that moment when I see something click with my students.”

Lunn has been with Dunwoody since 2002. He currently manages the Honda Professional Auto Career Training (PACT) program.

Sewing Program Featured on PBS Documentary Series Dropping Back In

Dunwoody College’s partnership with the Makers Coalition will again be featured on the PBS documentary series Dropping Back In.

ThSewing students at work.e five-episode series illustrates the enormous personal and societal costs to students who drop out of high school, and how successful training-based programs—such as those offered by Dunwoody—can help counter those losses.

Dunwoody’s Dean of Workforce Training & Continuing Education Debra Hanson (Kerrigan) as well as two sewing program graduates are featured in the fifth episode of the series “Building A Better Future.”

Two sewing students examining project.

“Building A Better Future” will air Sunday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. on Twin Cities Public Televison (tpt), with repeats on October 3 and 4. Pioneer Public Television (KWCM) will run the show on September 27 and 29.

If you can’t catch the documentary those evenings, the full show can also be found here:

Elftmann Student Success Center Receives 1st Place Website Excellence Award

WEA1-2015_NCLCA-LSCHEThe Elftmann Student Success Center (ESSC) received first place in the 2015 NCLCA/LSCHE Website Excellence Awards competition, which was announced earlier this month.

The Website Excellence Award is awarded annually to  a postsecondary learning support center that’s website exhibits accuracy, support and strong student engagement.

Elftmann Student Success Center staff left to right: Teresa Milligan, Ross Brower, Eeris Fritz

Elftmann Student Success Center staff left to right: Teresa Milligan, Ross Brower, Eeris Fritz

The competition–co-sponsored by the Learning Support Centers in Higher Education (LSCHE) and the National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA)– is open to all college and university learning center websites. This is Dunwoody’s second time entering and placing in the competition. The ESSC also received third place in 2012.

The Elftmann Student Success Center’s mission is to provide quality academic support and development to all Dunwoody students. Currently, the center includes support services such as tutoring, Guided Study Recitations, tip sheets, a technical video library, a Math Center, and a Writing Center.

“The changes in learning support within higher education have made it necessary for centers such as ours to get creative about how to support academics, and how to be responsive to changing student needs,” said Teresa Milligan, Senior Instructor and website manager. “Winning this award means we’ve made great strides toward providing that support.”

Students studying in the Elftmann Student Success Center

Elftmann Student Success Center

Websites qualified for the NCLCA/LSCHE Website Excellence Award must meet nearly 30 different set criteria, including an up-to-date announcements section; working alt labels on all graphics; a detailed history of the center; and recent photos of both students and faculty active in the center. All website content must meet the standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS).

“In the higher education landscape, this award has really allowed Dunwoody—a non-profit, private, technical college—to act as an exemplar and represent a sector of higher education that is often overlooked. This award has given us a chance to be recognized and promote positive changes,” said Milligan.

Milligan will accept the NCLCA/LSCHE Website Excellence Award on the center’s behalf October 6, at the NCLCA Conference in Milwaukee, WI.

Learn more about the support services the Elftmann Student Success Center provides.

Snow Devil 1012 team earns third place in Autonomous Snowplow Competition

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The Snow Devil 1012 plow team earned third place and the Golden Smile Sportsmanship Award last weekend at the Fifth Annual Institute of Navigation (ION) Autonomous Snowplow Competition.  The event is part of the St. Paul Winter Carnival and took place in Rice Park.

The team, lead by faculty advisors E.J. Daigle and John McShannock, was made up of Automated Systems & Robotics students James Adams, Tim Easter, Jim Herman and Evan Prokop; Electronics & Engineering Technology students Andy Haug and Donald Kries; and Engineering Drafting & Design student Tony Laylon.

The Snow Devil 1012 used a magnetic navigation system to track a 0-3VDC electronic signal. Course correction calculations were done in an Allen Bradley MicroLogix PLC.


The University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Zenith and Yeti plows earned first and second place. Dunwoody’s Snow Devil 1012 earned third place, followed by the University of Calgary’s Fighting Mongooses, North Dakota State University’s Thundar, Case Western Reserve University’s Von Snowmower, University of Minnesota’s Ground Squirrel, and North Dakota State University’s Snowmenator.

Faculty Advisor and Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle said the Snow Devil 1012’s simplistic design and marketability set it apart from the competition.

“Most of the robots had over $10,000 in just sensors. Our total robot cost was $3,000 and could be implemented today by embedding magnetic sensors into a sidewalk or driveway,” he said.

For earning third place, the Snow Devil team won $2,000. Part of the prize money was used to build this year’s robot, some was used for a celebration dinner for the team and the rest will be used to kick start next year’s team.

The team also won the Golden Smile Sportsmanship Award and $500.  Daigle said the team did a lot to deserve the sportsmanship award. The Dunwoody Snow Devils: helped every team with tools, wire and parts to make repairs; cheered the loudest for every team as they competed; organized and participated in the parade with two other teams; initiated crowd participation through an audible checklist and 1-800-SNO-PLOW; and helped tear down the competition field after the event.

WCCO Channel 4 News’ Rachel Slavik interviewed Daigle for the story “Autonomous Snowplow Competition Wows Winter Carnival.”

ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition

According to the ION Autonomous Snowplow Competition website: “The purpose of this competition is to challenge university and college students, as well as the general public, to design, build, and operate a fully autonomous snowplow to remove snow from a designated path. The objectives of this competition include encouraging students and individuals to utilize the state of the art in navigation and control technologies to rapidly, accurately, and safely clear a path of snow.”


Dunwoody students sweep national packaging design competition


A team of Dunwoody College of Technology Design & Graphics Technology students won first place in both categories of the Association of Independent Corrugated Converters (AICC) Annual Student Packaging Design Competition “Design to an Opportunity.”

The 2014 competition was a three-part structural and graphic design project and 27 colleges nationwide participated. The Dunwoody team–Stephanie Burdorf, Charlotte LaCour, Jenna Weiler, Dan Mueller, Noah Rabinowitz and Finn Pearson–was challenged to create a real-world marketing solution for the College that included a standing display for use at college fairs or on campus; a mailing envelope to send to potential students; and a welcome kit for new students.

“We were judged on the creativity, marketability, design attributes, manufacturing, durability, and ease of assembly for the structure of all three projects,” said team leader Stephanie Burdorf. “We were also judged separately on the graphics of all three projects on how well they created a brand and tied-in with each other to give them all a similar look.”

Graphically, the team used the College’s branding guidelines and in-house photographs, while also incorporating archived photos from the 1920’s and centennial seal to celebrate the College’s 100-year history.

“Structurally, we designed three separate units that would follow the enrollment process for Dunwoody that would allow optimal student retention. The standee is designed to rotate, allowing for viewer interaction as well as utilizing the entire space for attention grabbing graphics and information,” explained Burdorf. “The mailing envelope is designed to create a visually intriguing piece that serves as an attractive and durable folder. And finally, the welcome kit is designed to be handed out to new students as a place to hold all materials gathered throughout their first day experience. This structure was also designed to fit inside a locker, increasing locker sales as well as making it easier for a student to use throughout the year.”

Burdof said the team learned a lot through the competition.

“Not only have we all become more proficient with the Adobe and Esko programs and software, but we also all had a chance to work in a real world setting,” she said. “We had to work as a team, follow a strict timeline, research on what was in place as well as what was needed, find materials, and work with different departments as well as industry partners.”

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology program has a rich history of winning national competitions, but this is the first non-flexographic win, the first international win, and the largest and deepest in talent in terms of number of schools competing.

“Because of the timing of the competition, we are obliged to compete with first-year students, as no team member can participate after graduation, and the annual AICC deadline is in late June,” said Principal Instructor and Faculty Advisor Pete Rivard. “The four-year universities with their graduate programs typically field teams with juniors, seniors, and even graduate students, each with successive years of competition experience. So this is an absolute David vs. Goliath story, if you amend the details to have David surrounded by dozens of Goliaths.”

The Design & Graphics Technology faculty said they couldn’t be more proud of their students. For the past several years, they have observed North America’s best colleges and universities compete for the AICC recognition, and it was only last year that they felt the College was ready to enter the competition. Last year’s team won second place in both the structural and graphic design categories for their Lifeguard Chair.

Rivard said this year’s team took complete ownership of their project and delivered excellence with little faculty guidance.

The team expressed gratitude for the industry partners who helped bring their standee concept to life: the biggest industry partner Esko, for crucial design software; Liberty Carton-Golden Valley, who supplied the team at no cost with all the freshly manufactured corrugated that they asked for;  Ambassador Press and The Bureau, who provided CAD table time and some large format printing; and Dunwoody admissions and marketing staff members for initial guidance and concept critiques that helped the team design and manufacture marketing and admissions items that had real value.

The team was invited to attend AICC/TAPPI 2014 Corrugated Week, Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2014, at the Long Beach Convention Center in Long Beach, Calif.  They plan to use their $1,000 cash prize for the AICC contest win to go toward travel expenses to ensure all team members can attend the event. In addition to the monetary award, they will also receive an engraved plaque commemorating their win in the competition.

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology department offers two-year degrees in Graphic Design and Pre-Media Technologies.


Dunwoody history pictorial show, Alumni & Friends Reception July 17

Mill City MuseumAlumni & Friends Reception and Pictorial Show at Mill City Museum–Thursday, July 17

Join us from 6 to 8 p.m. for a very special evening of history, friendship and celebration at the Mill City Museum,  704 S. 2nd Street, Minneapolis, for the Alumni & Friends Reception and Dunwoody College Pictorial History Display.

No RSVP is required. Alumni, friends and the public are welcome.

For further information contact, or call 612-381-3064.
Dunwoody College, celebrating its Centennial in 2014, will hold a pictorial show at Mill City Museum highlighting the College’s history and the impact Dunwoody has had on the local community – from the founders William and Kate Dunwoody, to the present day.  Featuring historic photographs of the past 100 years, the show will run through Oct. 5.

William H. Dunwoody was the primary share holder of Washburn Crosby Company (now General Mills) and his involvement in the greater milling community was instrumental in making Minneapolis the Flour Milling Capital of the World for 50 years – it was Mill City.  Dunwoody is delighted to join with Mill City Museum a hundred years later to celebrate this relationship.

William and Kate Dunwoody were prominent citizens of their time and helped build many significant institutions that survive in today – General Mills, Wells Fargo, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Northwestern National Bank, and of course Dunwoody College of Technology.

Dunwoody College’s influence continues today as a leader in technical education and a producer of alumni who continue to make an impact on the community.  Alums such as M.A. Mortenson (Mortenson Construction), Howard Lund (Lund Boats), and Maurice Wagner (Morrie’s Automotive) are just a few examples of Dunwoody Colleges continued impact on the community.

Dunwoody was featured on “Life to the Max” May 17

Mike Max took a tour of Dunwoody College through its 100 years of history to the present day for his Life to the Max TV Show that highlights stories of perseverance, tenacity and winning attitudes.

If you missed the episode that aired on May 17, you can watch it at

 Mike Max takes a tour of Dunwoody College of Technology through its 100 years of history to the present day. A generous gift left by William Hood Dunwoody in his will started the Minneapolis technical college in 1914 and since then its reputation for excellence continues to grow. Mike meets with instructors, current students and wildly successful alumni of Dunwoody to find out what makes the college and its culture breed success.

“Life to the Max” is sponsored by Lifetouch and produced by Lifetouch Media Productions.

For more information about Life to the Max, visit

Dunwoody College of Technology’s Interior Design program receives CIDA accreditation

Dunwoody College of Technology’s Bachelor of Science Interior Design program has been granted a six-year accreditation from the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA)—an independent, non-profit accrediting organization for interior design education programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.

Dunwoody College of Technology joins the University of Minnesota as the only Minnesota colleges with CIDA accreditation.

To gain accreditation a college must have a four-year bachelor degree program that meets 16 standards related to mission, goals, curriculum; critical thinking, professional values and processes; core design and technical knowledge; and program administration.

Interior Design Program Manager Colleen Schmaltz noted Dunwoody’s Interior Design program has been in the process of refining curriculum and archiving student work to demonstrate CIDA standards for four years.

“It’s been a long process, but it’s been worth it because we understand the importance of achieving this accreditation for the success of our students, our program, and our profession” she said.

Schmaltz said adhering to the CIDA guidelines helped ensure the program included all the necessary elements to graduate capable, creative designers.

“Our approach is hands on. We’re a technical college and our students have superior technical knowledge with various design software programs,” she said. “We’re about educating designers who have practical knowledge and strong design expertise. Our graduates know what they’re doing on the first day on the job.”

Dunwoody’s focus in hiring Interior Design faculty is to bring in practicing professionals with a wide variety of specialties who are also educators completing advanced degrees.

“They’re extraordinary practitioners and excellent teachers. It shows up in students’ work big time. The level of expertise is there. The confidence is there,” she said. “I think the rigors of the program are such that people graduating from an accredited program know that the best firms are looking for it. They’re eager for interns and new hires with a solid educational background.

“We have a fabulous program. And we’re turning out fabulous designers who are passionate about their newfound professions.”



About Dunwoody
Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied technical education to more than 250,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers. . Located in the heart of the arts district in Minneapolis, and across from the Walker Sculpture Garden, Dunwoody College of Technology is fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (, and the State of Minnesota.


About CIDA

The Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) is an independent, non-profit accrediting organization for interior design education programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. For more than 35 years, this knowledge-driven organization has been passionately committed to the ongoing enrichment of the interior design profession through identifying, developing and promoting quality standards for the education of entry-level interior designers, and then encouraging, accrediting and supporting educational programs to aspire to those standards.

Through a process of program self-evaluation and peer review, accreditation promotes achievement of high academic standards, while making education more responsive to student and societal needs. The Council engages nearly 200 volunteers, all drawn from interior design practice and education, to carry out its work. More than 150 interior design programs are currently accredited by the Council, serving an estimated 20,000 students.

The Council for Interior Design Accreditation is recognized as a reliable authority on interior design education by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The CHEA-recognized scope of accreditation is professional level programs in interior design.

Source: CIDA website