Category Archives: Alumni & Friends

Q&A with a Dunwoody Baking Alum

Dunwoody alumni are innovators, entrepreneurs, top technicians and skilled workers.  Here is a quick Q&A with just one!

Photo of Tiffiny Meinert

Tiffiny Meinert, ’88 Baking
Owner, Tiffiny’s Tipton Bakery

Q. Where is the weirdest place you have ever met a fellow alum?

A. I live in very rural Iowa so I have not met a fellow Dunwoody alum yet. I have, however, through social media contacted my roommate from when we were both attending Dunwoody. She is in California now.

Q. Has there been a moment in your career when you thought “My job is awesome!” and what was that moment?

A. My job is awesome…. Well to be honest I have not had a “job” since I purchased the bakery 4 years ago. See I don’t have to go to work, I get to do what I love. Yes, there are trying times and I put in a lot of long hours but it has never felt like a “job.”

Q. What would your former classmates be surprised to know about you now?

A. My former classmates would most likely be surprised that I became a grandmother this year to twins.

Q. What is your favorite memory of Dunwoody?

A. My favorite memories of Dunwoody are when we would all work around the big wooden table rolling dough with Mr. Galloway, and
Mr. Letty showing me how I can make my flower cake designs have more dimension.

You can read more Q&As with Alumni & Friends in the Spring 2016 edition of the Alumni & Friends Magazine.

 

Dunwoody welcomes more than 400 alumni to proud tradition

This weekend, Dunwoody welcomed over 400 new alumni to its long history of outstanding graduates. The College’s Commencement Ceremony took place at the Minneapolis Convention Center at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 21.

Photo of Scott Crump

S. Scott Crump, co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Stratasys Ltd.

In his keynote speech, S. Scott Crump, co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Stratasys Ltd., shared the experiences, personal habits and attributes that led to his success as an inventor and innovator, including the invention of the first 3D printer with FDM, which revolutionized the product process by automating prototyping. He discussed the importance of creative, free thinking and the ability to follow through with the ideas that arrive through such thinking:

When you have a great idea, you need to create a clear vision of your new idea and have the persistence to prove its feasibility and then eventually convince others that new is possible. However, as a heads up, you should expect resistance to new.

We are all curious but generally, we resist change. So: most people are too afraid of the risk of social criticism and ridicule to take the chance of sharing inventions and innovations.

In fact, I believe this is the single biggest barrier to invention, because it actually threatens your comfort zone. To counter that fear, I always try to operate out of my comfort zone.

Mr. Crump also gave a challenge to the graduates:

Learn to use your creative zone, and make sure that you have a lot of fun along the way, which gives you the passion to make a difference; because it’s not just about a job.

Dream and follow your dreams; I challenge you to make a difference in this world. Solve big problems and don’t conform, be a non-conformist.

Alex Mars, who served as the Class of 2016’s student speaker, shared the impact an applied education at Dunwoody has made on her life:

Photo of Alex Mars

Alex Mars, Dunwoody Class of 2016 student speaker

We often hear the clichéd phrase “the sky is the limit”. I finished my last semester of the Welding program at Dunwoody in December. I took a welding position at an Aerospace company in Eagan. I build helicopter frames and airplane engine mounts for a living. The phrase “the sky is the limit” has taken on a literal meaning for me. Using the skills I have earned at Dunwoody, I build aircraft and send my dreams up into the sky.

In his concluding remarks, President Rich Wagner reminded the graduates:

Photo of Dunwoody College of Technology President Rich Wagner

Dunwoody College of Technology President Rich Wagner

The Dunwoody legacy is evident around our city, from the buildings Dunwoody alumni have designed and built, to the companies they’ve started, to the products they manufacture, to the designs they’ve created, and the projects they’ve managed. It is humbling and overwhelming to look at the impact Dunwoody alumni have had and continue to have on our neighborhoods, on our communities, on our state and on our nation.

And now, you carry a responsibility to hold fast to the values a Dunwoody education represents and to take with you the challenge of perpetuating Dunwoody’s great legacy through your actions and accomplishments.

Additional photos from Commencement can be found on the College’s Facebook page.

Photo credit: Stan Waldhauser Photo/Design

Stratasys Co-Founder S. Scott Crump to Keynote Dunwoody College 2016 Commencement

Photo of Scott CrumpDunwoody College of Technology is pleased to announce that S. Scott Crump, Co-Founder of Stratasys, Ltd, the leading organization for 3D printing innovation, will be the keynote speaker at the College’s Commencement on Saturday, May 21, at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

About S. Scott Crump

Scott Crump is the Chief Innovation Officer of Stratasys, focused on leading and managing innovation by originating and encouraging new ideas, which will result in new solutions and products to market.

Mr. Crump is the inventor of Fused Deposition Technology (FDM) and a co-founder of Stratasys, which began in his home garage along with his wife Lisa Crump. They shipped one system in the first commercial year and now Stratasys has over 150,000 3D Printers with customers.

He served as the CEO, Chairman, and Treasurer of Stratasys from the 1988 start up through 2012.

In addition, he is on the Board of Directors and is currently serving as Chairman of the Executive Committee since February 2015. Prior to that, he served as the Chairman of the Board since inception in 1988.

From 1982 to 1988, Mr. Crump was co-founder and Vice President of Sales of IDEA, Inc. They were a premier brand manufacturer of load and pressure transducers. Mr. Crump continued as a director and shareholder until its sale to Vishay Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: VSH) in April 2005.

Mr. Crump holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Washington State University and attended UCLA’s Business Management Development for Entrepreneurs. Mr. Crump is a registered professional engineer.

Developing a Leadership Mindset: Five Points

Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration, describes his personal leadership as a “work in process,” not a “work in progress.”

Photo of Ted Ferrara speaking at Dunwoody.

Ted Ferrara, ’77 Refrigeration, was the April 2016 Leadership Lecture speaker at Dunwoody.

“Some days progress, some days regress, but all days are part of a process,” Ferrara said. One of the owners of Standard Heating & Air Conditioning, a local, family-owned business, Ferrara shared his thoughts on leadership during the April 7 C. Charles Jackson Leadership Lecture Series at Dunwoody College of Technology.

The Dunwoody alum and immediate Past Chairperson of the Board of Trustees, Ferrara also holds a B.A. and B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Metropolitan State University and an MBA from Harvard University.

During his talk, Ferrara defined “Leadership that Matters,” as “Helping people get to a place they would not have otherwise been inclined to go,” and touched on five main points.

  1. Be a Good Follower.  Know what it is to be a good follower.  It is an active pursuit, not a passive one. Ask yourself, “Would I want me as a follower?” Good followers push back when they disagree and help ensure that their leaders are successful. Becoming a good follower helps future leaders develop understanding and empathy.
  2. Take Ownership. The organization you work for is an extension of yourself and taking ownership means going beyond the job description and taking responsibility to ensure that nothing falls through the cracks. At the same time, don’t take on everyone’s problems. Instead, empower others to become problem solvers.
  3. No Excuses. Leadership is difficult and risky personally, and things don’t always work out, but nobody buys excuses. Instead, ask yourself if you had a “do-over” knowing what you know now, would you have done anything different. By adopting a “no excuses” mentality you put your best efforts forward and unleash a lot of creative problem solving.
  4. Define Reality. Whether it’s an established and well-functioning enterprise or a total turn-around, a leader’s job is to first figure out where the organization is at and then help others understand that reality.
  5. Lead With Values. Define and communicate your core values. In an uncertain world, this is where you find certainty.  Shared values are the strongest reasons for people to follow you.

Watch the video

Dunwoody College celebrates Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month, and Dunwoody is celebrating in some very exciting ways!

Starting tomorrow, the College has several women-focused events on campus, including:

The 76th Diversity Forum: Women’s History Month with guest speaker Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson.
March 15, 12:30 p.m. in the McNamara Center
Contact: lparvis@dunwoody.edu

A Kate’s Club Meeting for all Dunwoody women interested in attending  a supportive, networking event.
March 17, 2:45 p.m.
Contact: katesclub@dunwoody.edu

A Salary Negotiation Workshop for students in Dunwoody’s Women in Technical Careers (WITC) Scholarship program.
March 18, 4:30 p.m.
Contact: mwhitman@dunwoody.edu

Note: If you are not a WITC student and are looking for salary negotiation tips, please contact rborchardt@dunwody.edu.

The College has also launched a social media campaign to celebrate women in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) professions—occupations that have been historically dominated by men. The campaign features Dunwoody women employees, students, and alumni who are pursuing or already working in a STEAM career.

Several of the campaign’s participants include:

Melysia_Cha

Emily_Miner

Beverly_White

Nicole_Nusbaum
The College invites all women in STEAM careers to participate! To join the campaign, simply tweet or instagram your photo, career choice, and a sentence about what makes you, you.

Make sure to use the hashtag #STEAMwoman or use our social media handle @dunwoodycollege.

Happy Women’s History Month from Dunwoody!

Honor Roll Spotlight: Norwood “Woody” Nelson

Photo of Woody Nelson, '60 Electrical GeneralWhen Woody Nelson graduated from Dunwoody in 1960 he could never have imagined where his degree would take him. The Electrical General degree not only landed him his first job doing electrical maintenance and repair work in the J&L Steel mines in Northern Minnesota, it also opened the doors that would eventually lead him into facilities management.

Before retiring in 1999, Nelson served as the Director of Corporate Facilities for all of Cummins/Onan — a global power generation leader. Nelson’s career at Cummins spanned more than three decades and took him all over the world. Even after retirement, Nelson has stayed active in his professional organizations and as a consultant.

Growing up on a small farm near Cloquet, Minnesota, Nelson said “fixing things was a way of life.” And during his senior year of high school he was a trainee working as an electrician for a paper company in Cloquet. The job appealed to him and after graduation he made the decision to move to Minneapolis and enroll at Dunwoody.

During the 18 months Nelson was at Dunwoody, he really enjoyed getting to know his classmates and knowing that he was learning a skill that he enjoyed doing.

Photo of Woody Nelson and classmates from 1960.

Woody Nelson (far right), 1960, with Dunwoody classmates.

After graduating, Nelson went to work for J&L Steel while his wife finished up her master’s degree in Library Science at the University of Minnesota.

Understanding that the career opportunities for both he and his wife were far greater in the Twin Cities, Nelson answered a general ad in the Star Tribune for an electrical tester and sent in a letter and resume. At the time, he didn’t know the position was with Onan Corporation, which would later be acquired by Cummins Engine Company. Nelson believes his degree from Dunwoody was one of the reasons he not only got an interview, but was offered a job the same day.

His career at Onan took a different path than the one he expected. He was soon tapped to take on the foreman position and that position led him into his career in facilities management. By 1971, Nelson was the Manager of Plant Engineering for Onan.

Nelson liked the variety and challenge of his work. His work not only meant managing the current facilities, but helping design the new ones. He also became active in several professional associations, including serving as President of the American Institute of Plant Engineers (now Association for Facilities Engineering – AFE) local chapter and serving on the National Board of AFE for 12 years, becoming National President in 1993. In fact, Nelson was honored professionally by his colleagues in 1996 when he was inducted into the AFE’s College of Fellows.

During all this time, Nelson has stayed active and connected to Dunwoody. He and his wife Muriel feel strongly about giving back and have made the decision to become Legacy Association members by including the College in their estate planning.

“Muriel and I have been blessed, so we want to give something back to the places that helped us,” Nelson said. “I hope that in doing so, someone else will have the opportunity to have as much fun as I did in this career and in this life.”

Read more feature stories in the 2015 Annual Report.

 

Honor Roll Spotlight: Gary N. Petersen

Gary N. Petersen
Retired President and COO of Minnegasco
Dunwoody Board of Trustees
1990-present

Photo of Gary N. Petersen

Gary N. Petersen

Gary Petersen has always approached his service to Dunwoody College of Technology with a “never say no” philosophy.

For the retired President and Chief Operating Officer of Minnegasco (now Centerpoint Energy) this has translated into 25 years of volunteer service as a member of the Dunwoody Board of Trustees, including two years as Chair and another two years as Treasurer. In addition, Petersen has served on numerous committees and even chaired the Good to Great Capital Campaign, which ran from 2001-2009.

Petersen’s long history with Dunwoody first began in 1990. As the new Chief Operating Officer for Minnegasco, Petersen was proud of the company’s long history of hiring Dunwoody grads.

“Dunwoody has always provided the best technicians,” Petersen said.

So when he was asked to join the Board of Trustees, Petersen was happy to say “yes.”

“When I joined, the Board had so much great experience and leadership,” Petersen said. “It took me a couple of years to figure out how I could contribute.”

Of the 160 individuals who have sat on the Dunwoody College of Technology Board of Trustees over the past 101 years, Petersen has had the pleasure to know and serve with 81 of them.

A Certified Public Accountant, Petersen graduated from Iowa State University with a B.S. degree in Computer Science. His career first began in public accounting, which led to his work with public utilities and then to senior management. His background in finance meant Petersen was a natural fit for the Finance and Audit Committee at Dunwoody.

In addition, Petersen’s leadership experience in the areas of strategic thinking and planning led to his involvement in developing Dunwoody’s formal program evaluation system, which is still used by the Board to this day.

In 1998, Petersen retired from Minnegasco and became an independent consultant. Even after his departure from the utility company, Petersen has remained a valued and active member of the Board of Trustees.

Besides giving of his time and talents, Petersen and his wife Barbara have also donated generously to the College. “There is definitely a joy of giving” Petersen said, adding that his affinity to Dunwoody comes from knowing that there really is a Dunwoody Difference that can be seen in the students and graduates who leave here ready to work from Day 1.

In addition to his volunteer service to Dunwoody, Petersen also served as a Board Member for the YMCA for more than 20 years and held several volunteer roles with his church. In fact, through his involvement with all three organizations, Petersen has been directly involved in eight different capital campaigns.

And when he is not serving on Boards or giving back to his community, Petersen is an avid sports fan who enjoys spending time with his family.

When he looks to the future, Petersen is excited about the direction that Dunwoody is heading, with the addition of more 4-year Bachelor of Science degrees offered through its new School of Engineering.

“We’re on the cusp of taking off in the next 100 years,” Petersen said.

Read more spotlight stories in the 2015 Annual Report.

 

 

Learning the “look” of confidence, turning perception into reality

When Twanya Hood Hill was in elementary school she was painfully shy and her mother would often tell people “She’s bashful, but she’s smart.” From those early experiences, Hood Hill discovered that by adopting “the look” of confidence she could change the way people viewed her – and eventually how she viewed herself.

Twanya Hood Hill speaks at Dunwoody College of Technology for the C. Charles Jackson Leadership Lecture Series

Twanya Hood Hill, Vice President of Leadership Development for Ameriprise Financial Services, shared how self-confidence can be the key to success during the Nov. 5 C. Charles Jackson Leadership Lecture Series.

The Vice-President of Leadership Development for Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Hood Hill now helps others unlock their own leadership potential by learning the skill of self-confidence. Hood Hill is also an adjunct faculty member in the Master of Arts and Organizational Leadership program at St. Catherine University.

“Confidence is not about how you feel about yourself, it’s how others see you,” Hood Hill explained during the Nov. 5 Jackson Leadership Lecture, held at Dunwoody College of Technology. The lecture series features key executives from the business community, who speak on a range of leadership topics.

During her talk entitled “Self-Confidence: The Key to Success,” Hood Hill provided several strategies for building self-confidence:

  • Fail fast – Put your ideas out there and then learn to adjust
  • Avoid negative thoughts
  • Manage Perceptions – Beware and be aware of how others perceive you
  • Learn the “Charisma Formula” – Strength + Likeability = Charisma

“Eventually people will start to see you differently, and you will see yourself differently,” Hood Hill said.

The breakfast lecture series is held the first Thursday of every month. The next event will be held at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3 and will feature Nancy Dahl, the President and Chief Operating Officer of Tastefully Simple, a national home tasting company. For more information, or to view past events, visit www.dunwoody.edu/alumni/jackson.