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Dunwoody College offers unique summer camp opportunities

Looking for something to do this summer? Dunwoody College of Technology is delighted to offer the following camp opportunities for 2016:


STEM Camp Sponsored by Boston Scientific: June 13-16, 2016

Dunwoody’s Robotics & Manufacturing department invites high school students entering their junior and senior years to explore various STEM programs and careers. Learn from technicians, engineers, students, and instructors through short lectures and demonstrations followed by hands-on projects.

Open to students entering 11th and 12th grade.

Click here to register! 


Discovering Interior Design: June 20-23, 2016

Interior Design faculty and other professional designers from the design community will help participants study color, materials, architectural drawing and digital media. Campers will also visit design firms and beautiful spaces around the Twin Cities.

Open to students entering 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grade.

Click here to register!


Rosie’s Girls: June 20-24 and June 27-July 1

Campers can embody Rosie the Riveter at Dunwoody College’s first ever Rosie’s Girls Camp, hosted by the Girl Scouts River Valleys. Girls entering 6th, 7th and 8th grade will have the chance to learn how to weld, wire, build, draft and design—all with help from women instructors.

Open to girls entering 6th, 7th and 8th grade.

Click here to register!


Arts-n-Crafts, Robots & Computing Camp: July 25-29, 2016

Hosted by Dunwoody’s Computer Technology department, campers will learn the basics of computing through arts and crafts projects. Build and program robots with LEGO Mindstorms ®, learn about Artbotics, and program with Scratch. Dunwoody faculty and staff will lead the activities.

Open to students entering 6th, 7th and 8th grade.

Click here to register!


 

 

 

Architecture students place 2nd, 3rd in 2016 Skills USA State Competition

Photo of Eli Abnet

Eli Abnet at 2016 SkillsUSA Minnesota

Architecture students Eli Abnet and Charles Evans Bille placed 2nd and 3rd respectively at the 2016 SkillsUSA Minnesota Competition, which was held earlier this month at various locations throughout the Twin Cities including Dunwoody campus.

SkillsUSA—a national organization made of students, educators and industry representatives working to provide America with skilled workers—regulates the competitions, which are held annually at the local/state, national and global level.

Photo of Charles Evans

Charles Evans Bille at 2016 SkillsUSA Minnesota

During the contest, Abnet and Bille participated in a short written exam, a hand drafting exercise, and a computer-drafting project. The competition aims to test students’ problem-solving abilities as well as their drafting techniques.

Get involved

The College has been participating and placing in SkillsUSA competitions for many years, with students earning gold in 2015 and 2013.

If you are interested in joining the 2017 SkillsUSA team, please contact Associate Director of Career Services Rob Borchardt at 612.381.3322 or rborchardt@dunwoody.edu.

About SkillsUSA

According to mnskillsusa.org: SkillsUSA Minnesota is part of a national organization that serves over a quarter million student members annually, organized into more than 14,700 chapters and 54 state and territorial associations (including Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands). The Minnesota Association has offered leadership opportunities to over 200,000 student members since 1967, with a current annual membership of over 3,000. There are chapters in 29 technical colleges and 50 high schools or cooperative centers, with potential to serve many more. SkillsUSA is governed by a Board of Directors, elected from teachers that advise local chapters, and representing both the high school and college divisions and industry representatives. All programs are offered as integral to the curriculum.

Two Interior Design students design show sets for Northwest Community Television

Photo of Angelica Sedano and Alyx Paschke

L to R: Angelica Sedano and Alyx Paschke

Late last year, Northwest Community Television (NWCT)—a non-profit organization that offers free production classes, equipment use, and channel time to those in the northwestern suburbs of the Twin Cities—realized they needed a change.

“Our current TV sets were outdated, falling apart, and overdue for an overhaul,” Studio Manager Nikki Jackett said.

And as the 2015 fiscal year was coming to a close, Jackett realized they had some dollars left in their budget. So, she chose to put that money towards set renovation.

A perfect match

“We only had six weeks to get ideas together and the money spent,” Jackett said.

Photo of existing NWCT set

NWCT set prior to remodel.

“Knowing design is not in my wheelhouse and having a limited budget, I asked my boss if I could reach out to students to work with. I’ve had good experiences working with students in the past. I love their energy and eagerness.”

When searching for the students, Jackett said she “never looked beyond Dunwoody.”

“I’ve always heard good things about the school, so it was the first and only one I emailed,” she said.

And when senior Interior Design students Alyx Paschke and Angelica Sedano learned of the project, they knew they had to be involved.

“Set design is something that has always interested me,” Paschke said. “I’m going to grad school for themed entertainment design so this project was very closely aligned with what I am hoping to do.”

The design process

Due to the wide variety of shows offered by NWCT—which includes talk shows, sports shows, children shows, cooking lessons and craft demonstrations—Paschke said, “versatility was a major aspect in the design concept.”

Photo of existing NWCT sets and photo of what they would like after the remodel.

Paschke and Sedano used SketchUp—3D modeling software they use for class projects at Dunwoody— to generate ideas for the new sets.

“We decided it would give us the most for our budget to repurpose and reuse many of the existing sets and set elements,” she said.

And while the students did have complete design freedom, there were some limitations.

“The sets had to be mobile, lightweight, and easily assembled and deconstructed for transportation to and from the set storage warehouse,” Paschke said. “We also had an extremely small budget for all of the sets, construction supplies, finishes, furniture and décor, which allowed us to get creative.”

Paschke and Sedano used SketchUp—3D modeling software they use for class projects at Dunwoody—to design the sets. Here they finalized the set colors, furniture pieces and design budget. Then, they set out to purchase the supplies.

“It felt a little bit like an HGTV show,” Paschke laughed as she described their overflowing carts at Ikea.

In an effort to keep the costs down, the students also approached several industry partners for help—and were successful in doing so.

Example of what a set would look like after the remodelSherwin-Williams agreed to donate the paint for the sets, and representatives from Shakopee Lowes Home Improvement provided budget guidance. Prime General Contractors also helped with transportation.

Thanks to their generosity, the two students were able to stay under-budget and upgrade six existing sets and the station’s kitchen.

The final product

Photo of one of the final sets

One of the final sets designed by Paschke and Sedano.

For Paschke and Sedano, however, the best part of the process was actually seeing the project come to life.

Paschke explained: “As students, a lot of the time we design and we do the 3D renderings—but that’s as far as we get. So it was really fun to see our work actually constructed.”

“It was our first real project like this so it was a little intimidating,” Sedano said. “But we worked together with everyone really well. It was nice to have our first project be with great people.”

Photo of Paschke and Sedano

Paschke and Sedano at the NWCT Open House.

Jackett agreed: “Throughout the entire process, Alyx and Angelica demonstrated an unbelievable passion for design and a keen understanding of what it means to meet the expectations laid forth while also looking outside of the box in exuding their own creativity. I can’t wait for the next opportunity to work with them and recommend them to others.”

According to NWCT’s latest newsletter, this is the Station’s first remodel since the media center opened in 1998. NWCT displayed the newly renovated sets at an Open House event late last month.

Paschke and Sedano will graduate this May with a bachelor’s degree in Interior Design.

Learn more about Dunwoody’s Interior Design program.

Dunwoody Design & Graphics Technology students work in industry before graduation

At Dunwoody, Design & Graphics Technology students don’t just gain real-world experience in the state-of-the-art digital press and packaging design lab on campus. They also gain real-world experience in, well, the real world.

This year nearly all second-year Design & Graphics Technology students are working in the field through internships while finishing their last semester of the program. All but one of these internships are paid.

Second-year Design & Graphics Technology student talks to prospective employers at the annual Design & Graphics Intern Expo. Internship resources for students

Students find internships through many resources offered on campus, including the annual Design & Graphics Technology Intern Expo and professional connections made through faculty networks.

The Intern Expo happens on the third Thursday of February every year. “Many of our employers know this and put it on their calendar months in advance,” Pre-Media Technologies Principal Instructor Pete Rivard said.

During the Expo, students set up their own booths and present their portfolios to prospective employers.

“This event is the culmination of all the work they have done since starting in the program. I am always impressed with the quality of the final portfolios,” said Senior Graphic Design Instructor Gerald Timmreck. “My favorite part is watching them explain their work and interact with the industry professionals.”

In addition to the Expo, students obtain internship opportunities through professional connections made by faculty.

“Most – if not all – of the internships this year were the direct result of personal faculty connections to employers. We try and stay connected throughout the year – for past grads and current students as well,” Graphic Design Principal Instructor Tom Herold said. “Many of our first-year students are already working in the field – at least one student was working before starting the first week of class.”

Instructors maintain these relationships with employers by participating in industry organizations like Printing Industry Midwest (PIM) and by keeping a pulse on industry needs.

Second-year Design & Graphics Technology students pose for a photo in the College's photo studio. Students working and interning in the field

Students are working and interning in places like Graphic Measures International (GMI), which certifies, monitors and measures the performance of packaging suppliers worldwide.

“Right now – by my count – we have seven program graduates and four current students placed at GMI,” Rivard said. ” At least four of our grads working at GMI now have significant global travel and international business experience in places like China, India, Costa Rica and Ireland.”

Darren Davis, a second-year graphic design student, is working as a graphic designer and marketing assistant at C3 LLC, the creators of the caster-lift shopping cart safety ropes used to gather and transport shopping carts from the parking lot to the store – standard equipment used among the world’s leading grocers and retailers.

“I’m already applying what I’ve learned at Dunwoody in different ways. While C3 has a very specific brand I must adhere to, I’m also given a lot of freedom to develop new ideas for ways to spread awareness of their product,” Davis said.

Graphic Design Instructor Tom Herold works with a student during class. Minnesota is the Promised Land for design and graphics; Dunwoody trains to employers’ needs

“People from all over the world send their design and packaging work to Minnesota,” Rivard said, explaining that Minnesota has a $9 billion design and graphics industry.

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology faculty members work closely with the industry to train students to employers’ needs. Through this approach, faculty members have developed a hands-on curriculum unique to Dunwoody.

At the beginning of their studies, students’ are issued a Macbook complete with roughly $40,000 worth of packaging and design software – including Adobe Suite, Esko, and CAD programs. In addition to being trained in industry-standard software, students gain hands-on experience in the College’s state-of-the-art printing and packaging lab – complete with a Xerox iGen4 Diamond Edition digital press and an Esko Kongsberg V20 cutting table. The combination of design and packaging projects gives students a well-rounded education on both the print and package design processes.

“Dunwoody is the only college in Minnesota that teaches both packaging and design side by side,” Rivard explained. “That’s why employers go nuts over our students.”

Interested in learning more or applying to the program? Get more information on Design & Graphics Technology offerings.

Dunwoody Surveying students place 1st in 2016 NSPS Student Competition

Second-year students Wyatt Spencer, BJ Klenke, Doug Pouliot, Joe Irey, Brandon Davis, Jake Blue and team observer Patrick Kowal took first place in the two-year degree program category of the 2016 National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS) Student Competition earlier this month.

Photo of Wyatt Spencer, BJ Klenke, Doug Pouliot, Joe Irey, Brandon Davis, and Jake Blue.

L to R: Wyatt Spencer, BJ Klenke, Doug Pouliot, Joe Irey, Brandon Davis, and Jake Blue.

The annual event—which was held in conjunction with the 2016 Surveying & Mapping Conference—was held in Crystal City (Arlington), VA, and was open to all two- and four-year colleges across the country.

New event, new skills

To enter the competition, the Dunwoody team—advised by Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology Principal Instructor Kelly Ness—had to complete a boundary and topographic survey of a parcel of land, approximately 10 acres in size, for a hypothetical land development project.

The team was then required to create a “metes and bounds legal description” of the land lot (i.e., a description of the land and its boundaries) and construct a plot map of the surveyed area.

This information—along with a safety plan, field notes and data calculations—was compiled into a final project binder and then presented to a panel of industry experts and competition judges.

“In order to complete the project, we had to develop the types of skills that are used everyday in the industry,” Ness said. “That was the most beneficial piece for the students—the knowledge and skills obtained throughout the competition.”

A welcome win

A first-time event for Dunwoody and the students, Ness said he couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome.

“Winning the competition is a huge achievement and one that will be recognized by future employers and peers in the surveying community.”

Spencer, Klenke, Irey, Davis, and Blue will graduate with an associate’s degree in Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology this May. Pouliot will follow in Fall 2016. Kowal hopes to participate in the 2017 NSPS Student Competition next Spring.

The College would like to thank industry partner Westwood Professional Services for their generous donation, which allowed the students to travel toand participate inthe competition.

Learn more about Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology.

Auto industry has the need, Dunwoody has the grads

Industry speaks at March open house

Photo of Auto Open House eventDunwoody Automotive invited representatives from Luther Automotive Group, Walser Automotive Group, and Alliance of Automotive Service Providers-Minnesota (AASP) to speak at the College’s open house event this month, which was held Tuesday, March 15.

Steve Reinarts, Automotive Dean, said the goal of the event was to help organizations find potential hires as well as provide students and their guests with a better understanding of what the automotive job market looks like right now.

And what does it look like?

According to Judell Anderson, Executive Director of AASP: “Desperate.”

All three organizations confirmed that automotive job opportunities are skyrocketing—and shops and dealerships across the nation are in need of technicians.

“When I left my office, we had 43 openings,” said Meg Miller, HR Recruiter for Luther Automotive Group. “The opportunities are endless.”

In fact, auto mechanics are in such demand, many automotive organizations are hiring recent graduates—and even current students—to work. And for organizations like Walser Automotive, Dunwoody College is one of the first places they look.

Why a Dunwoody student?

“For years, we have all gone out and simply tried to steal one another’s technicians,” said Walser Automotive Corporate Service Director Jeff Lamott. “But as a business model, it doesn’t make sense to put an ad in the paper and hope you can get someone from another store.

Photo of students talking at Auto Open House event“Maybe that’s a short term solution for now, but probably a better solution would be to hire people at an entry level—student graduates for an example—bring them in, provide them with mentorship, and then grow them into a technician from the ground up,” he said.

“And to do that, we immediately look for organizations that provide students like that, or we look around and ask where we have gotten people from before…and Dunwoody would be the answer to both of those.”

Luther Automotive also has a long history of hiring Dunwoody graduates.

“Several of our managers and technicians have come from Dunwoody,” Miller said. “We always look for a well-rounded individual–someone who has the skill but also has the drive to learn more.

“We definitely find that in a Dunwoody student.”

Industry reps to return May 24

A first-time event for the department, Reinarts couldn’t be more pleased with the end result.

“I think the most beneficial part of the event—for both prospective students and their parents/guardians and guests—was being able to talk directly with industry,” he said.

“When parents come to an open house, they’ll often ask ‘will my son or daughter be able to get a job, and if so how much will they be able to make?’ Those answers, coming from me or one of our other instructors, could be perceived as self-serving.

“But by having industry there, we direct those questions to them and they’ll tell the parents and the students exactly how much they will be able to make and what the job market and career outlook looks like right now.

“That is why we wanted them there. So prospective students can get the story first-hand and hopefully consider choosing automotive as a future career,” he said.

Photo of guests talking at Auto Open House eventDue to the success of this month’s event, Dunwoody Automotive plans to host industry partners again at the College’s May open house, which takes place on Tuesday, May 24, from 3 to 7 p.m.

Prospective students can RSVP here.

If you are interested in speaking about your organization at the upcoming event, or becoming more involved with Dunwoody Automotive, please contact Reinarts at sreinarts@dunwoody.edu.

Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson speaks at Dunwoody’s Diversity Forum

Attorney General Lori Swanson speaks at Dunwoody's Diversity Forum in celebration of Women's History Month.

Attorney General Lori Swanson speaks at Dunwoody’s Diversity Forum in celebration of Women’s History Month.

Around 120 Dunwoody students, faculty and staff attended the latest Diversity Forum on March 15, joining Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson to celebrate Women’s History Month. Attorney General Swanson talked about what the Attorney General Office does and later took questions from the audience.

From left to right: Principal Instructor Karen Schmitt, Principal Instructor Leo Parvis, Attorney General Lori Swanson, Provost Jeff Ylinen, and Principal Instructor Jenny Saplis.

From left to right: Principal Instructor Karen Schmitt, Principal Instructor Leo Parvis, Attorney General Lori Swanson, Provost Jeff Ylinen, and Principal Instructor Jenny Saplis.

Swanson was elected to office in 2006 as Minnesota’s first female Attorney General and reelected in 2010 and 2014. During her time in office, Attorney General Swanson has been an advocate for Minnesota citizens in areas like consumer protection, predatory lending, health care, utility rate hikes, telecommunications, public safety and protecting senior citizens from financial fraud.

In addition to this month’s Forum, Dunwoody is recognizing Women’s History Month by hosting several women-focused events and celebrating STEAM women – women who work in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics.

The next Diversity Forum

Don’t miss the next Diversity Forum entitled Holocaust Commemoration featuring artist, writer, and genealogist Susan Weinberg and holocaust survivor Dora Zaidenweber at 12:30 p.m., on April 19, in the Holden Center. All are welcome and refreshments will be provided.

For more information or to RSVP, contact Dr. Leo Parvis at lparvis@dunwoody.edu. Dr. Parvis is a Principal Instructor and Diversity Programs & Education Coordinator at Dunwoody College of Technology.

Dunwoody College celebrates Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month, and Dunwoody is celebrating in some very exciting ways!

Starting tomorrow, the College has several women-focused events on campus, including:

The 76th Diversity Forum: Women’s History Month with guest speaker Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson.
March 15, 12:30 p.m. in the McNamara Center
Contact: lparvis@dunwoody.edu

A Kate’s Club Meeting for all Dunwoody women interested in attending  a supportive, networking event.
March 17, 2:45 p.m.
Contact: katesclub@dunwoody.edu

A Salary Negotiation Workshop for students in Dunwoody’s Women in Technical Careers (WITC) Scholarship program.
March 18, 4:30 p.m.
Contact: mwhitman@dunwoody.edu

Note: If you are not a WITC student and are looking for salary negotiation tips, please contact rborchardt@dunwody.edu.

The College has also launched a social media campaign to celebrate women in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) professions—occupations that have been historically dominated by men. The campaign features Dunwoody women employees, students, and alumni who are pursuing or already working in a STEAM career.

Several of the campaign’s participants include:

Melysia_Cha

Emily_Miner

Beverly_White

Nicole_Nusbaum
The College invites all women in STEAM careers to participate! To join the campaign, simply tweet or instagram your photo, career choice, and a sentence about what makes you, you.

Make sure to use the hashtag #STEAMwoman or use our social media handle @dunwoodycollege.

Happy Women’s History Month from Dunwoody!