All posts by William Morris

American Technical Education Association national office to be housed at Dunwoody College

Minneapolis, MN, May 2, 2012 — The American Technical Education Association (ATEA) has officially relocated its national office to Dunwoody College of Technology. ATEA is a national professional organization that serves faculty, administrators, educational services vendors, and companies that hire graduates from technical programs.

“It is, indeed, a privilege for the premier post-secondary technical education professional development organization to partner with one of the nation’s premier private technical colleges,” said Dr. Larry Moser, Director of the Secondary Technical Center of South Arkansas Community College and ATEA President.

“The central location of Dunwoody College of Technology in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area will give the ATEA greater exposure and access to the many professional educators involved in technical education.  As President of the American Technical Education Association, I know I speak on behalf of our Board of Trustees in affirming that the ATEA/Dunwoody partnership promises to be one of the most strategic decisions made by the ATEA organization.”

Sandra Krebsbach has been hired as the new executive director of ATEA. Dr. Krebsbach holds a Ph.D. in Educational Policy and Administration from the University of Minnesota and has previously served as dean of technical trade and apprenticeship programs at Saint Paul College.

“Dr. Krebsbach brings to post-secondary technical education professional development a strong background of academic involvement in post-secondary technical education and an extensive exposure to the political mechanisms influencing the development of technical education,” Dr. Moser said. “We welcome her contemporary and dynamic approach to enhancing all aspects of technical education professional development and to developing strategies to keep technical careers and technical training in the public discourse.  I and the Board of Trustees anticipate many good things to come from both the partnership with Dunwoody College of Technology as our ATEA office site and the great background and activities of Dr. Krebsbach as our Executive Director.”

“What is unique about ATEA is that our members really know each other,” Dr. Krebsbach said. “Our members develop strong connections and engage in dialogue that helps spread best practices in the field throughout the nation.”

“Dunwoody College has long been active in the ATEA and is pleased to be able to provide a location for the organization,” Dunwoody College President Rich Wagner said. “In fact, as a leading advocate for technical education, the ATEA continues the legacy of Charles Prosser, Dunwoody’s first director and the father of technical education in the United States. We also welcome Dr. Krebsbach and look forward to working with her.” Dr. Wagner is also the vice president and president elect of ATEA.

For the past 34 years, ATEA was housed on the campus of North Dakota State College of Science in Wahpeton, ND. The move to the Twin Cities brings with it the advantages of a major metropolitan area with many corporate headquarters and access to an international airport.

“I’m excited that ATEA will now be located at Dunwoody,” Dr. Krebsbach said. “I think it will be especially helpful for it to be in the Twin Cities because Minnesota is such a powerhouse in healthcare, printing, information technology, precision manufacturing, automated packaging, construction and other industries that employ graduates of technical programs. Many Minnesota based companies have a national workforce, relaying on technical colleges in other states to provide trained employees. ATEA can be a helpful partner in professional development and best practices in those states as well as in Minnesota”

ATEA was chartered in Delmar, NY, in 1960. From the beginning its goal was to “promote technical education for interested and qualified youth and adults … recommend standards for technical education … [and] provide an opportunity for an exchange of ideas among persons in the technical education field.”

The mission of the American Technical Education Association is to serve as the premier provider of professional development for postsecondary technical educators. It holds both a national conference and regional conferences.   It also gives out yearly awards to educators, students and other individuals who support the organization’s goals and publishes a refereed journal twice a year, which is edited by Dr. Sandra C. Coyner of the University of Akron.

The next national conference will be held March 20-22, 2013, in Chattanooga, Tenn., and will be held in the Twin Cities in 2014, the year that Dunwoody celebrates its Centennial.

As a national organization, ATEA draws its leadership and membership from across the country. Current members of the executive committee in addition to Dr. Moser and Dr. Wagner include: Jane Hildenbrand, chair and professor of early childhood education, Ivy Tech Community College; Dr. James King, vice chancellor, Tennessee Technology Centers; Bob Wallace, director of finance, Tennessee Technology Centers; and Dr. Paul Young, president, North Wyoming Community College.

In addition, the ATEA board includes members from institutions located in the Northeast, South, Midwest and West.

About Dunwoody: Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit, technical college in the Upper Midwest. For more, visit dunwoody.edu.

Darlene Miller share thoughts on 2012 and manufacturing

Darlene Miller, president and CEO of Permac Industries Inc., was recently included in a Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal round up of local executives thoughts on the coming year in business.

Miller serves on President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness and has been instrumental in the development of the Right Skills Now program. In the interview the MSP Business Journal asked what could be done to “improve the manufacturing condition of the Twin Cities”?

Miller’s response was: “Grow more skilled and trained people, such as those enrolled in our ‘Right Skills Now’ program at Dunwoody and South Central College…”

Click here to read the full story (subscription required).

Dunwoody College hosts conference for technical educators

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

William Morris, Manager of Marketing & Communications
(612) 381-3367; wmorris@dunwoody.edu

Dunwoody College hosts conference for technical educators

Minneapolis — March 28, 2011 — Dunwoody College of Technology is the host institution this year for the annual conference of the American Technical Education Association (ATEA), which takes place March 30 – April 1. The conference will be held at St. Paul’s Crowne Plaza Riverfront and will bring together postsecondary technical educators from across the country to share best practices in applied and technical education.

Keynote speeches will be presented by:

  • William Symonds, director of the Pathways to Prosperity project, who will speak on “Pathways to Prosperity: Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Young Americans for the 21st Century”
  • James Brazell, a technology forecaster, who will speak on “The Future is Here: Mainstreaming Community College Technical Programs”
  • Corporate Trainer, Columnist and Entertainer Stevie Ray, who will talk about speaking in public and thinking on your feet
  • Rachel Lund, principal instructor in Arts & Sciences at Dunwoody College, who will speak on “Navigating a Life Interrupted”

Breakout sessions will cover everything from changes in the collision repair industry to 3D printing to using web conferencing. Dunwoody faculty will present the following sessions:

  • Principal Instructor Leo Parvis: “Managing Diversity in the Technical Professions”
  • President Rich Wagner: “Leaders in Postsecondary Technical Education Roundtable”
  • Principal Instructor Rachel E. Lund: “Setting Your Course for Great Leadership”
  • Program Director Chad Kurdi: “Significant Changes to NEC2011”
  • Senior Instructor Arlinda Henderson and Senior Instructor Jenny Saplis: “An Innovative Approach to Teaching the Arts to the Technical Thinker”
  • Principal Instructor Pete Rivard: “Considering the Carton: Educating Inside the Box”

In addition to the conference sessions, there will be a tradeshow featuring a variety of exhibitors.

For more information, visit the ATEA 2011 National Conference web page.

Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology is the only private, not-for-profit technical college in the Upper Midwest. It has provided a hands-on, applied technical education to more than 300,000 men and women, who in turn have gone on to meaningful and rewarding careers. Located on the western edge of downtown Minneapolis, Dunwoody is fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

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ASA Minnesota scholarship for Dunwoody student

The American Subcontractors Association of Minnesota held its 11th Annual General Contractor of the Year, Scholarship and Membership Excellence Award Dinner at the Mendakota Country Club on Jan. 27, 2011. Brooks Schuettpelz, a Dunwoody Electrical Construction Design and Management student, was one of the lucky Scholarship Recipients at this year’s dinner.

ASA-MN scholarship winner Brooks Schuettpelz

State Farm donates vehicle to Dunwoody Collision Program

Chevy Cavalier front right view before shot State Farm Insurance Company is once again donating a repairable vehicle to Dunwoody College’s Collision Repair & Refinishing Program. The company has donated five vehicles over the past five years. This year’s vehicle is a 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier LS and will be worked on by our Collision students over the next eight months.

The donated vehicles provide hard to find structural repair training and advanced vehicle systems training for our students. After Collision students and faculty repair them, the vehicles are sold. State Farm stipulates that any net profit on the vehicles they donate be used for equipment for the Collision Program. For example, profits from recent donations helped the Program purchase a squeeze type resistance spot welder last year.

A representative from State Farm said: “These donations are a great example of how State Farm is working with the Auto Body repair program at Dunwoody. This collaboration supports improvement in the collision repair process — something that benefits our customers, repairers and State Farm. It also makes a positive impact on the environment. Donating vehicles helps reduce the amount of waste added to our nation’s landfills.

State Farm is committed to meeting the needs of our communities, and this program is a great opportunity to meet a need and make a difference.”

Dunwoody’s connection with State Farm began with alumnus Bob Roiger, an estimatics trainer for the company. Roiger graduated in 1978 from the Collision Repair and Refinishing program. State Farm also helps with the Skills USA contest for Collision Repair.

The Collision Program will put the profit from the sale of the repaired and refinished Cavalier towards a computerized measuring system and is looking to partner with another repairable vehicle donation source per year to help reach that goal sooner.

Click here for more photos of Collision student projects. We’ll post the after shots of the Cavalier once it’s complete about 8 months from now.

Star Tribune column features Dunwoody alumnus, deployed serviceman Kofi Law

Gail Rosenblum’s Star Tribune column today featured Kofi Law, who graduated from Dunwoody’s Automotive program. The column focused on his journey from citizen of Togo to Minnesota resident (and Dunwoody student) to American citizen and U.S. serviceman. It also featured comments from Student Services Advisor Molly Malone.

Rosenblum writes:

Law, 28, had dreamed of becoming a U.S. citizen since he was a boy. He moved to Minneapolis in January 2003 from Togo (where the average daily temperature is 80 degrees), taught himself English, graduated from Dunwoody College of Technology and gathered the required paperwork to become a new American.

A few days after a joyful citizenship celebration at Bethel University in Arden Hills in August, Law headed to Fort McCoy in Wisconsin for premobilization training.

Later she reports on a conversation she had with Molly:

Molly Malone Docken, student services adviser at Dunwoody, calls him “the nicest guy in the whole world,” and a model student to boot. “He would come early and stay late,” she said. “Whenever he had questions, he would ask. When he got nervous, he’d seek tutoring. Deadlines looming? He never missed one. Then he would follow up. We would love to clone him.”

For more, click here to read the full column on the Star Tribune website.